leadership center

CWLC Luncheons

Christian Women’s Leadership Center has the privilege of hosting luncheons for local Christian businesswomen. Join us as we network, learn from one another, hold leadership discussions, and gather for lunch. Led by Christian businesswomen in our community, the 11:30-12:30 hour provides a refreshing time to grow in our understanding of leadership and leadership skills. 

Registration of $8.00 includes the cost of lunch; however, feel free to join us even if you want to bring your own lunch. Please register online no later than noon on the Monday preceding each luncheon.

If you'd like to receive email reminders about the luncheons each month, please signup here.

CWLC Leadership Certificate Program

 

Go directly to our learning portal to get started on our Leadership Certificate Program.

Christian Women’s Leadership Center (CWLC) exists to engage Christian women in discovering and developing their leadership gifts and skills through holistic learning experiences so they may serve effectively as God calls them in life, the marketplace, and the church.

If you are ready to create or refine your personal leadership style, you’ve come to the right place! Designed for women leaders who desire for their leadership to be rooted in their relationship with Christ and based on biblical principles, the certificate program will provide flexible learning opportunities for women with busy lifestyles and multiple responsibilities. Courses will cover leadership foundations, leadership formation, and leadership skills.

Internship Program

WMU’s internship program is designed to be a partnership with students and their respective college or university. Students receive academic credit in exchange for an internship that involves them in real-life work situations and provides them with educational experiences not obtainable in a classroom setting. 

All of our internships are unpaid in exchange for course credit. Students must be a junior or senior in college to qualify. Internships can be customized to fit the need of the intern. 

Christian Women's Leadership Center - CWLC

The Christian Women's Leadership Center exists to engage Christian women in discovering and developing their leadership gifts and skills through holistic learning experiences so they may serve effectively as God calls them in life, the marketplace, and the church.


Following Well: 3 Secrets Great Leaders Know

While leadership sounds appealing, many consider following to be subservient. “I’ll never be a follower” is a statement we often hear. In the course Follower Skills, Danette High states, “We will spend far more of our lives following than leading. Following is not a place to let your guard down, or to take a break from leadership.”

Great leaders understand the vital and dynamic relationship that must exist between leaders and followers. They also know when to lead and when to follow. These leaders remain excellent followers. Danette compares following and leading to a couple dancing. “Both have their own moves, but if the leader and follower truly partner, that’s where the beauty occurs.”

Since developing follower skills is practically non-existent in leadership training, many leaders have no idea how to do so. There are at least three secrets that great leaders know about following well.

Spirtual Formation as a Leader

We all have opportunities to lead and to follow, and in both cases, our spiritual formation makes a difference in how we treat one another in those roles.

The Bible says that God knew us while we were in our mother’s womb and that He knows our days—including every experience we’ve had. So, often with gaping wounds, we limp into positions of leadership. We want to present ourselves to everyone as a whole person, and we hope that they won’t notice our bandages and scars. Yet the more we try to hide our wounds, the more we expose them.

How does this relate to spiritual formation? In the words of Dr. Noel Forlini, “Spiritual formation is a process of presenting our whole selves to God in order to experience the love of God, so that we can love God, others, and ourselves.”

The whole self includes everything—even the parts that we’ve worked so hard to forget about. Our hidden wounds are actually an important part of our spiritual formation. If we present them to God, we will find ourselves more able to love God, others, and ourselves.

Eternity-Based Leadership

 

It is no secret that we often focus much of our lives on results-based leadership, which doesn’t seem to be biblical. Sometimes this pull for results comes from our deep desire to be found worthy in our jobs. We desire to be considered a bargain—pulling more than our weight and contributing significantly. Yet, as we read Scripture,we find something different.

In the first chapter of 2 Peter, we see a man who has walked with Jesus coming to the end of his life. What is it that Peter most wants to leave behind? And how does it compare with what we want? For Peter, he wants the believers (the brethren in KJV and my brothers and sisters in NIV) to make every effort to confirm their [your] calling and election so that they will not stumble. He wants them to have a rich welcome into the eternal kingdom of Jesus Christ. Why does this concern Peter so much, and why should we be concerned about eternity rather than the results we want to see?

Let the North Light Shine

Crawling over a desk to get to the window cords certainly didn’t look professional, but it was the best I could do. The wide desk impeded my access to the cords.

I’m not a job hopper, but when I do start a new job, my first step is opening the windows. February 8 was no different. To my delight, these windows face north.

Painters love north light because it’s constant. The indirect light allows the artist to judge the values more easily than changing light that tends to come from other directions.

Even educators write about the academic benefits of natural light, but few teachers in my school opened the blinds on their windows. We often know what’s good for us but focus on the negative aspects instead—“the glare on the board gives me problems,” “the room is too hot when I open my windows,” etc.

Still, teachers used to tell me that they would walk in my room when I wasn’t there and just sit and think. “I don’t know what it is about your room,” they said. I wanted to tell them it was the natural light, but I knew they would follow with reasons they couldn’t open their blinds. So, I just smiled and thanked them for the compliment.

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Follow to Lead

While it may be popular to talk about leadership and to dream about being in charge, the Bible paints a different picture of leadership. Christians who lead because a still, small voice* calls them to do so know the difference.

Why follow God’s leadership? Following God’s leadership works differently than planning our own future. It requires us to hear His voice. While some hear His voice daily, others have not positioned themselves to listen. Sometimes God has to get our attention so that we can hear Him. God often uses circumstances to bring us to a position to lead, and getting to that position may require a strange and unexpected journey.

On a journey, we usually experience some discomfort. Our muscles get tired. Our bodies ache. Our habits may change. We may find ourselves sleeping on uncomfortable pillows or eating foods that don’t taste quite the same as our home-cooked meals. These are small discomforts compared to what our Bible heroes experienced.

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National WMU Appoints New Leadership Consultant

Claudia Johnson

(BIRMINGHAM, Ala.) – National Woman’s Missionary Union (WMU) has hired Claudia Johnson to develop training opportunities for Christian women’s leadership. Johnson has a wealth of experience in missions leadership, having served as a teacher and missionary with the International Mission Board (IMB) for nearly 28 years. She will serve as the leadership consultant for WMU’s Missions Resource Center and Christian Women’s Leadership Center (CWLC).

“We are thrilled to have someone with Claudia’s wealth of teaching and missions experience serve in this role,” said Wanda Lee, executive director of national WMU. “We believe her unique perspective on leadership, having lived it out in another culture, will be key to the success of the CWLC and how we engage women in leadership within their church, workplace, and community.”

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