adoption

6 Things to Celebrate on Orphan Sunday

Orphan—it’s a word with a decidedly sad connotation. The United Nations Children’s Fund and its global partners define an orphan as a child under 18 years of age who has lost 1 or both parents to any cause of death. Nearly 140 million children around the world meet that definition. So what is there to celebrate on Orphan Sunday, November 12? Plenty.

1. Celebrate adoptive families in your church and community. Enlist 1 or 2 adoptive parents to share their story of how God used adoption to grow their family and their faith. Ask them to speak during a morning worship service or another churchwide event for this special emphasis, or record their stories and show the video during the service or post it, along with prayer requests, on the church’s Facebook page or website. Pray for these families as they seek to train up their children. Pray for those going through the adoption process as they wait to bring their children home. Ask about other ways your church can support these adoptive families financially, emotionally, physically, and spiritually.

Missions and Adoption

Adoption and orphan care play an important role in missions. Whether you feel God calling you to adopt, you are working with orphans in some capacity, or you were adopted yourself, your story is an important one.

We hope one of these resources can help you on your journey. 

30 Days of Hope for Adoptive Parents

30 Days of Hope for Adoptive Parents - $9.99

 

WorldCrafts partners with Mully movie ministry movement

(Birmingham, Ala.) – June 21, 2017 – WorldCrafts, the fair-trade division of WMU, is partnering with Mully Children’s Family (MCF) to help share the story of Dr. Charles Mully and expand WorldCrafts impact among impoverished artisan groups around the world.

MCF, a nonprofit organization in Kenya that seeks to transform the lives of street children and youth living in poverty, was founded by Mully.

Mully was the first born in a family of eight, living in poverty in Kenya. At age 6, he was abandoned by his parents as they left in search of a better living. He grew up begging on the streets and became a Christian as a teenager.

When Mully was 17, he walked more than 40 miles to Nairobi to seek employment. He found work and met his future wife, Esther. He became a wealthy entrepreneur and respected community leader, and he and Esther had eight biological children.

Back to Top