Adults

Sewing Ministry Projects

"A thimbleful of imagination combined with a few creative stitches can lead to truly amazing sewing ministry projects."

The patterns listed in this .pdf are (in the following order):

  1. Knitted Eyelash Scarf
  2. Crocheted Eyelash Scarf
  3. Pillowcases
  4. Mastectomy Pillows
  5. Knitted Prayer Shawl
  6. Crocheted Prayer Shawl
  7. Knitted Dishcloth
  8. Drawstring Bags

Printable PDF instructions (5 pages)

Projects listed in the April 2013 Missions Mosaic.

Go Forward

I have been privileged to lead Girls in Action in my church for more than 13 years. I have taught first-, second-, third-, and sixth-grade girls.

Through all these years of teaching, the missionaries we have studied have inspired me, too. It is not just the girls who learn about missions during our class time.

I am excited that we have several young mothers who are leading in GA this year. My missions vision is to not only teach my third-graders but also encourage these young teachers.

You see, the more these teachers learn, the more they are going to want to know, give, and go. They can’t help but be inspired to become involved in missions and go forward just as the girls are learning to do.

As a result of these young women sacrificing time to teach GA, they are laying the foundation for teaching their own children about missions.

I can’t wait to see the impact these moms are going to have in our church and around the world because of their excitement about missions!

Jennifer Booth writes from her home in Little Rock, Arkansas. Connect with her on her blog at JenniferBooth.com.

A Church on Mission

Our church held a missions conference this past October. We hosted several missionaries from our state and nation and around the world. Church members were able to interact with missionaries on a more personal level.

The goal of this conference was to encourage church members to commit to a new level of missions involvement.

For some, that meant they would start praying for missions. Others were challenged to give to missions. Still others committed to support those who wanted to go on missions trips. And many committed to actually go on a missions trip.

The most exciting result of the conference was the 3 members who dedicated their lives to full-time Christian service.

Because of this conference, our church has developed a greater vision for reaching the lost. Many more are now involved in missions and are doing their part to spread the gospel message.

Jennifer Booth writes from her home in Little Rock, Arkansas. Connect with her on her blog at JenniferBooth.com.

Unique Church, Expanding Vision

A vision gives direction and motivation. Without a vision, I can flounder around, aimlessly wandering from one interesting thing to another. Without a vision, a church can have worship services and programs, keeping members busy but unclear about the future.

Our church is rather unique. We are a small, new Southern Baptist church and a declining, but established, Methodist church meeting together as a community church. My Baptist pastor husband had a vision for a church in an area where the declining population was unable to support several pastors but different denominations could worship together. Both the Baptist church and the Methodist church retain their forms of governance, yet we come together in everything else. My husband preaches solid Bible sermons each Sunday in a traditional service.

Currently the missions vision of the church is local. We support a variety of local missions causes, everything from a food pantry to a residential ministry for recovering addicts. This is good, but we are being nudged to expand that vision. How will that look?

My Vision = Their Vision?

How do you introduce a broader vision of missions into a church where many members truly don’t understand missions?

I teach Sunday School and many lessons lend themselves to sharing missionary stories from my WMU connections. We have had friends who serve with the International Mission Board come to speak and share videos of their work. This past December, we began introducing the Lottie Moon Christmas Offering for International Missions to the congregation.

I am part of a women’s group that I am slowly trying to transition from a mind-set of local missions to national and worldwide missions. We are doing Bible studies that I am salting with missionary stories as much as possible. It would be wonderful to begin a new Women on Mission group. I am praying we would have some women who would be interested in that or we could work toward beginning an Adults on Mission group.

This experience is teaching me that it’s not always an easy or rapid process to encourage people to embrace your vision as their own. It takes patience, prayer, and more patience!

A Vision? A Vision!

My husband and I have been blessed with 5 grandchildren who range in age from 5 to 13. When each child was still in the womb, my vision was for him or her to be born with a healthy little body. Now that our grandchildren are getting older, my vision is changing.

For 3 of them, my vision is that they will continue to pursue the dreams the Lord has begun to put in their hearts and live for Him. My role is to love and encourage them as well as support the spiritual foundation their parents provide.

For 2 of them, my vision is that they will make it through a hard family situation with as little damage to their tender hearts as possible. My role is to love them and be a safe haven for them. And I help their mother build a spiritual base from which they can come to know the Lord.

We can have a vision for family members, for ourselves, for our churches. Listen, ponder, and seek the Lord and He will give you a vision and reveal your role in making that vision a reality. 

Sharon R. Neff lives in Arcola, Mississippi, and never had a vision that she would be a pastor’s wife.

Next Generation Vision

As a parent, I’ve always strived to teach my children about missions and involve them in mission action whenever possible. My children are now 16 and 13 and grew up in Girls in Action and Royal Ambassadors. They know what it means to be on mission.

My vision for them is to continue being on mission every day of their lives. There are many opportunities with our church and their school to continue to develop this mind-set.

I plan to encourage them to be involved in missions by having them participate with me, helping them find ways they can do missions, and educating them about current events so they can brainstorm ways they can be on mission.

It’s up to us to cultivate a vision to encourage and teach the next generation to live a missions lifestyle that honors God.

Jennifer Booth writes from her home in Little Rock, Arkansas. Connect with her on her blog at JenniferBooth.com.

Missions for Advent

I love Christmas, especially now that I’ve learned to pull back and focus more on the eternal gift of Christmas. Incorporating Advent practices into our family’s celebration was the turning point.

This year, I added an international missions emphasis. Our weekly Advent prayers included 2 of the missionaries featured in the Week of Prayer for International Missions prayer brochure.

Prayers flow into action. Invite your friends and neighbors to a WorldCrafts party. Consider hosting the Intriguing Indonesia party since Indonesia is the focus of this year’s International Mission Study. VisitWorldCrafts.org/parties.asp for everything you need to introduce your friends and neighbors to this country and this WMU ministry that develops sustainable, fair-trade businesses among impoverished people around the world.

Prayers, action, and joyful giving draw the season to a close. A bountiful Lottie Moon Christmas Offering for International Missions is the result. The heavens sing, and God multiplies it all for good.

Lucretia Mobbs loves this season of light.

Missions Matters!

Sometimes it “pays” to look down. This is one way our family finds extra funds for the Lottie Moon Christmas Offering.

When our children were young, we began the tradition of depositing any money found throughout the year into our Mission Jar. This included money discovered in the pockets of clothing to be washed, in vehicle seats, between couch cushions, and especially lying on sidewalks—I once stumbled across $7 this way! In December, we would take our money to a coin changer and include the total in our missions offering.

While our Mission Jar was a family project, it is always interesting to discover the creative ways churches publicize the international missions emphasis. My friend Sue’s church makes Lottie Moon come alive for young children by displaying a life-size cutout of Ms. Lottie and allowing the youngsters to compare their own size to this diminutive missionary to China.

Truly Humble

T. W. Hunt’s discipleship class changed my life. He told the class about a growing awareness that he spent more time reading about God than he did reading God’s Word. Hunt explained that this conviction led him to read only the Bible for the next 5 years. Amazing! Not 1 newspaper, magazine, or book, only the Bible. His face was lit from within as he taught, and I sensed the powerful presence of God in him. Oh, how I wanted to experience God like that.

Hunt taught us with humility and gentleness, and he made me realize that what you feed grows. I left that conference knowing that I had to narrow what I allowed into my life through media.

Philippians 4:8 became the test. Is it true, honorable, just, pure, lovely, commendable, or morally excellent? Is it worthy of praise? These questions became my guide.

It’s been 20 years since that conference. I’m still narrowing and learning from great spiritual teachers.

Lucretia Mobbs loves quiet time in the Psalms.

Pages

Back to Top