Adults on Mission Blog

By All Means Changes Lives

“El Salvador will never be the same,” said one of our church members when she saw who had decided to go. While I can’t say that is true of the country, it is certainly true for those of us preparing to go. As of this writing, a dozen men and women are preparing for our church’s first international missions trip. Six of the 7 women in the group are members of our Martha Robinson Baptist Women, and some have never been outside the United States. As we prepare to step out of our comfort zones to change lives in El Salvador, changes within our lives and the life of our church began months ago.

Personally, I began working with our Wednesday night children’s ministry, at first serving food but soon joining in teaching first- and second-graders. Others joined in as well. Several children have received Christ as Savior and their families are starting to attend on Sunday morning.

Celebrate, Evaluate, and Look Ahead

For many small churches, WMU and Women on Mission or Baptist Women are synonymous. Perhaps 1 or 2 groups of women of various ages meet monthly to learn about missions, pray for missionaries, and develop a missions project. The pattern rarely changes.

Instead of doing the same thing with your adult missions group, celebrate what worked, evaluate what didn’t, and enter the new church year ready to pray, learn, support, and develop a missions lifestyle.

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Building the Kingdom One Friendship at a Time

The phrase “hustle and bustle” used to apply to the hurriedness of the holiday season, but for many, it now applies to everyday life. As we add just one more thing to our to-do list, we often let time spent building relationships fall to the wayside. However, meeting new people and building relationships should be an intentional part of life for every believer.

Consider how you can change ordinary activities into ones that build the kingdom of God. Sporting events, especially those our children participate in, offer opportunities to share life with others. If you sit in the same seats, seeing the same people each game, why not engage in conversation? Listen intentionally, ask questions, and you will be amazed what you might learn.

Home-cooked goodies are a way to get to know your neighbors. A recent television commercial depicts a young family treating its neighbors to a weekend pancake breakfast. Who could you invite?

Art as Outreach

I am not an artist, but I recently discovered a way to explore painting and accomplish a project I am not afraid to display. The popularity of social painting is increasing as a way to get together with friends, have a good time, and come away with something uniquely yours.

Our church hosted several painting parties recently as missions offering fund-raisers and outreach events. Men and women, teenagers to senior citizens, novice to experienced artists gathered together to pray, paint, and fellowship. We invited unchurched friends, family, and co-workers to join the fun and demonstrated Christ to them.

Search your area for social painting venues that offer group classes or order kits online and plan your own party. Then grab a friend, some canvases, acrylic paint, and brushes and paint for the love of Christ together.

Lynn Durham is a Kentucky pastor’s wife with a heart for teaching women how to increase their faith.

WMU in the New Year

The summer season is quickly coming to a close. Before you know it, it will be time to start the new church year. What are you as a leader doing to prepare for the new year in WMU?

If you have not considered attending training in your state, then you should definitely look into it.

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Simple Hospitality

Bill and Betty were a sweet couple in our church. Several years ago, Betty and I were involved in a mentoring group where she was my mentor.

Our times together were encouraging. Yet they were nothing elaborate. Betty just simply invited me into her home for conversation each week. We shared coffee and some of Bill’s fabulous desserts. He was quite the cook!

Just a few years ago, they both went to be with the Lord just 1 day apart. When I heard of their deaths, I was sad; however, God reminded me of their gracious hospitality and encouragement when I needed it the most.

He also reminded me that I need to find someone to whom I can show hospitality. I have such a great example of what that looks like, so I have no excuse. Will you join me in showing hospitality to someone today?

Hospitality on Mission

“Do not forget to show hospitality to strangers, for by so doing some people have shown hospitality to angels without knowing it” (Heb. 13:2).

Hospitality is often thought of as an event usually in someone’s home where people are entertained. However, hospitality goes so much deeper than that. Hospitality is an attitude of welcome. It does not matter what kind of home you own or how good a cook you are. It just means you welcome others with open arms.

How can you use hospitality in a missional way? It’s quite easy, actually. It’s as simple as inviting unsaved friends, family, or neighbors into your home. When people feel welcomed, they are more open to hearing about the gospel.

Provide them with a meal and conversation where you learn more about them and their needs. As you learn more about them, you can begin to share the gospel and relate it to their current situation in life.

Engaging New Members

Being the new person is not always easy, especially if you are prone to shyness. So it’s important that we as church members or members of a missions group be intentional in making new people feel welcome. How do you engage guests or new members in your church or missions group with hospitality?

Here are a few ways you can practice hospitality with them:

  • Smile—Greet guests and new members with a friendly smile. Let them know how glad you are to meet them.
  • Remember—Ask their name and find ways to remember it. When you see them again, you’ll be able to call them by name.
  • Connect—Find a point of connection. Maybe you both enjoy the same hobbies or share similar tastes in food.
  • Encourage—Offer a word of encouragement and let them know they are welcome in your church or group at any time.

Connecting with Children through Stories in VBS

“How is our church using stories in VBS [Vacation Bible School] to connect with children?” I asked our children’s minister, Ms. Alexia, through email. “Do you have a story to share?”

Reading her response, I sensed her excitement.

She explained that one year, all the children had gathered for their VBS daily missions experience. The screen on the wall displayed the computer slide presentation, and the props set the stage.

Gaining every child’s attention, the teacher began pouring her enthusiasm into each young heart about our church’s participation with Baptist Global Response’s Bucket Project. She shared how many Africans suffer with AIDS and that sometimes the buckets contain the only provisions those people receive throughout their illness.

One child, who had been adopted by a church family, suddenly stood and pointed at the picture on the screen. “My mom got a bucket just like that. We got one of your buckets.”

Saving Your Children through Life Stories

My daughter sat across the table from me, her forehead crinkling with confusion. “What do I do, Mom?”

Quiet hovered throughout the house this Sunday afternoon, with everyone else napping. I propped my elbows on the table. My thoughts twisted in every direction. How do I answer her? She’s 18, an adult now. I can’t say no, and I certainly can’t encourage her. She had been asked out on a date by someone she doesn’t really know, and she was conflicted on how to answer him.

Just as God passed along stories, the bad with the good, I’ve passed along my stories to my daughter—the bad with the good. She knows my teenage prodigal moments. She knows my story.

I touched her hand. “You don’t have to go.”

She saw right through to my heart, knowing my concern for her—my concern for her to learn from my bad and be the wiser. “What if I tell him that I’d like to get to know him better before I go on a date with him?”

“That would be wise.”

“Mom, I’m so glad I can talk to you.”

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