Adults on Mission Blog

Sharing Jesus

As a believer, I know that I ought to be telling others about Jesus. Yet I find myself thinking of it as a complex endeavor for which special training is needed.

Although it isn’t complicated, it is a good idea to make preparations by learning pertinent verses, putting our testimony into words, and praying for guidance.

Actually there are numerous ways to share Jesus with others. The following are but 3 of them:

Hot Fudge Cake and the Gospel (Part 1 of 3)

For me, it was really just about the hot fudge cake. After sitting through classes all afternoon and studying in the library well into the evening, my brain was tired. I slumped in the booth at my favorite diner, finishing my pasta bowl while dreaming of a hard-earned hot fudge cake topped with a scoop of vanilla, when all of a sudden God started interrupting my thoughts.

“God, You want me to witness to my waiter? That can’t be right. He’s a teenage boy; how could he possibly relate to anything I would say? And the other customers—dare I be so rude to tie up too much of his time and risk getting him in trouble with his manager?” Of course, there was also the little matter of having absolutely nothing intelligent to say. But God kept pressing.

I made an agreement with God. Since I had no idea how to start this conversation, I acknowledged God could put His words into my mouth (Jer. 1:9). “God, when the waiter comes back, I’m going to open my mouth, and whatever comes out has to come from You.” Then I waited and prayed. And nibbled on hot fudge cake.

Time for Missions

Our fast-paced society leaves us with little time to devote to missions. If we are not careful, then we schedule all our time doing “good” things and often overlook the “best” things God has for us.

Here are a few tips to help you make room on your calendar for missions:

  • Look at responsibilities for which you have volunteered. Decide which ones are in line with what you believe God has called you to do in your life.
  • Determine the time frames for these current responsibilities. If there is a specific end date to fulfill a responsibility, do your best to make it through that time so you can complete your commitment. If it is an activity that has no specific end time and is not aligned with what you believe God has called you to do, eliminate it from your schedule.
  • When asked to take on another commitment, spend a lot of time in prayer and consideration so that you do not automatically take on something else that will distract you from God’s purposes for your life.

With just a little planning and a lot of prayer, you can make time to be involved in missions.

New Year, Fresh Vision?

On a personal level, I’ve been examining my missions vision. God has given me an overall vision of being involved in missions ever since I accepted His gift of salvation as a child. Yet the specific vision has changed as I’ve gone through life stages. Can you relate?

I have participated in missions trips at home and abroad. Several good friends serve as missionaries with either the North American Mission Board or the International Mission Board, personalizing missions to me. I have been involved in missions education and served as president of Mississippi WMU.

My specific vision now is, on the one hand, to be willing to serve Him wherever He calls, yet on the other hand, I believe that I’m to be a missions encourager. An encourager to my church to share the wide vision with them. An encourager to smaller churches around me in my association and state to participate in missions as fully as they can.

Could you take some time to discover the missions vision God has for you? He may want to give you a fresh vision for this New Year. All you have to do is ask.

Go Forward

I have been privileged to lead Girls in Action in my church for more than 13 years. I have taught first-, second-, third-, and sixth-grade girls.

Through all these years of teaching, the missionaries we have studied have inspired me, too. It is not just the girls who learn about missions during our class time.

I am excited that we have several young mothers who are leading in GA this year. My missions vision is to not only teach my third-graders but also encourage these young teachers.

You see, the more these teachers learn, the more they are going to want to know, give, and go. They can’t help but be inspired to become involved in missions and go forward just as the girls are learning to do.

As a result of these young women sacrificing time to teach GA, they are laying the foundation for teaching their own children about missions.

I can’t wait to see the impact these moms are going to have in our church and around the world because of their excitement about missions!

Jennifer Booth writes from her home in Little Rock, Arkansas. Connect with her on her blog at JenniferBooth.com.

A Church on Mission

Our church held a missions conference this past October. We hosted several missionaries from our state and nation and around the world. Church members were able to interact with missionaries on a more personal level.

The goal of this conference was to encourage church members to commit to a new level of missions involvement.

For some, that meant they would start praying for missions. Others were challenged to give to missions. Still others committed to support those who wanted to go on missions trips. And many committed to actually go on a missions trip.

The most exciting result of the conference was the 3 members who dedicated their lives to full-time Christian service.

Because of this conference, our church has developed a greater vision for reaching the lost. Many more are now involved in missions and are doing their part to spread the gospel message.

Jennifer Booth writes from her home in Little Rock, Arkansas. Connect with her on her blog at JenniferBooth.com.

Unique Church, Expanding Vision

A vision gives direction and motivation. Without a vision, I can flounder around, aimlessly wandering from one interesting thing to another. Without a vision, a church can have worship services and programs, keeping members busy but unclear about the future.

Our church is rather unique. We are a small, new Southern Baptist church and a declining, but established, Methodist church meeting together as a community church. My Baptist pastor husband had a vision for a church in an area where the declining population was unable to support several pastors but different denominations could worship together. Both the Baptist church and the Methodist church retain their forms of governance, yet we come together in everything else. My husband preaches solid Bible sermons each Sunday in a traditional service.

Currently the missions vision of the church is local. We support a variety of local missions causes, everything from a food pantry to a residential ministry for recovering addicts. This is good, but we are being nudged to expand that vision. How will that look?

My Vision = Their Vision?

How do you introduce a broader vision of missions into a church where many members truly don’t understand missions?

I teach Sunday School and many lessons lend themselves to sharing missionary stories from my WMU connections. We have had friends who serve with the International Mission Board come to speak and share videos of their work. This past December, we began introducing the Lottie Moon Christmas Offering for International Missions to the congregation.

I am part of a women’s group that I am slowly trying to transition from a mind-set of local missions to national and worldwide missions. We are doing Bible studies that I am salting with missionary stories as much as possible. It would be wonderful to begin a new Women on Mission group. I am praying we would have some women who would be interested in that or we could work toward beginning an Adults on Mission group.

This experience is teaching me that it’s not always an easy or rapid process to encourage people to embrace your vision as their own. It takes patience, prayer, and more patience!

A Vision? A Vision!

My husband and I have been blessed with 5 grandchildren who range in age from 5 to 13. When each child was still in the womb, my vision was for him or her to be born with a healthy little body. Now that our grandchildren are getting older, my vision is changing.

For 3 of them, my vision is that they will continue to pursue the dreams the Lord has begun to put in their hearts and live for Him. My role is to love and encourage them as well as support the spiritual foundation their parents provide.

For 2 of them, my vision is that they will make it through a hard family situation with as little damage to their tender hearts as possible. My role is to love them and be a safe haven for them. And I help their mother build a spiritual base from which they can come to know the Lord.

We can have a vision for family members, for ourselves, for our churches. Listen, ponder, and seek the Lord and He will give you a vision and reveal your role in making that vision a reality. 

Sharon R. Neff lives in Arcola, Mississippi, and never had a vision that she would be a pastor’s wife.

Missions for Advent

I love Christmas, especially now that I’ve learned to pull back and focus more on the eternal gift of Christmas. Incorporating Advent practices into our family’s celebration was the turning point.

This year, I added an international missions emphasis. Our weekly Advent prayers included 2 of the missionaries featured in the Week of Prayer for International Missions prayer brochure.

Prayers flow into action. Invite your friends and neighbors to a WorldCrafts party. Consider hosting the Intriguing Indonesia party since Indonesia is the focus of this year’s International Mission Study. VisitWorldCrafts.org/parties.asp for everything you need to introduce your friends and neighbors to this country and this WMU ministry that develops sustainable, fair-trade businesses among impoverished people around the world.

Prayers, action, and joyful giving draw the season to a close. A bountiful Lottie Moon Christmas Offering for International Missions is the result. The heavens sing, and God multiplies it all for good.

Lucretia Mobbs loves this season of light.

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