Wrap-Around Care

Wrap-around care. I was struck by this phrase that was new to me. I learned of the phrase in the article, “Contagious Love for One More Child,” 1 in Sharing, the newsletter for Florida Baptist Children’s Homes. The article focused on a church whose members have become invested in caring for vulnerable children by becoming foster families, adoptive families, or wrap-around families. The article speaks of wrap-around care as offering resources or support to adoptive and foster parents. Wrap-around care is a way of showing these families they are not alone by giving them encouragement and assistance in various ways.

As a Mission Friends teacher, you may have families in your church who are foster parents or adoptive families. Though not all children in foster or adoptive care have been diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), all of these children have gone through some type of trauma. I like the idea of giving wrap-around care to these foster and adoptive families so they can concentrate on providing for the emotional and physical needs of the child.

What are some ways of providing wrap-around care to these families?

Wrap-around care is a way of showing these families they are not alone by giving them encouragement and assistance in various ways.

  • Commit to pray for the family and their needs.
  • Send a note of encouragement periodically to the parents. Share an uplifting Scripture promise or share something positive the parent is doing for the child.
  • Provide diapers for a foster child who is an infant or toddler.
  • Offer to tutor or give homework help for an older child. Some children need someone to read with them.
  • Take a meal to the family on a regular basis.
  • Involve others in taking meals by using an online meal sign-up site.
  • Offer to provide clothes when a child is placed in their care.
  • If your church has a Parents’ Night Out in which there is a charge per child, offer to pay for their family so the parents can take a time out.
  • Offer to mow the lawn, blow the leaves, or shovel snow off their driveway.
  • Go to the grocery store for the family. Ask a parent to give you their grocery list so you can pick up the items they need.

Opening our hearts and hands to encircle around foster and adoptive families. That’s what comes to my mind when I think of the phrase wrap-around care. When you have a preschooler in your Mission Friends who is a foster or adopted child, offer your support with the wrap-around care you can give to the family.

1Boyd, Julie. “Contagious Love for One More Child,” Sharing, Florida Baptist Children’s Homes, Fall/Winter 2015, 3–4.

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