Children's Blog

Making Educational Choices

During our first overseas missions assignment, our children attended an international school that catered to children of the international diplomatic and business communities as well as the wealthier citizens of the local community. The school was bilingual. Our kids learned all subjects in English and in the local national language. Due to the heavy demands of the school and the travel required to and from school, our kids woke up early and came home late. By the time our children completed their nightly homework, ate dinner and took a bath, it was bedtime. That doesn't take into account the extracurricular activities they were involved with. Our family life quickly revolved around school. Our family began to pray about alternatives, including homeschooling.

When we returned to the United States for our first furlough (now called stateside assignment), the teachers in our school district went on strike. We had to make a choice about how to finish the children’s school year. We chose to homeschool.

An Inside Peek into MK Schooling

I zipped up my backpack and stepped outside into the dark night. To arrive at school on time, my dad woke me at 5:30 each morning. Faith Academy was over an hour away, but I was used to the commute. Outside, the street was quiet. My next-door neighbor was a senator, and I imagined he and his family were still snug in their beds. Sometimes I climbed onto our roof after school and peeked into their stately property. They had the nicest private pool I had ever seen in the Philippines!

Making Difficult Decisions About Schooling

We arrived in Bangkok, Thailand, in July 1990, with an 8-month-old baby boy. In all the thoughts of transitioning to a new country, it never occurred to us that there wouldn’t be a school for our children to attend. In one of our first missionary team meetings after we arrived, we found ourselves listening to a lively discussion about the cost of international schools and about the decision that, moving forward, all missionaries would homeschool their children until high school.

This news came as a bit of a shock to me. When the time came for us to choose a curriculum, the process was pretty simple. We looked around at all the missionary kids and went to the mother of the family whose children seemed to be doing well with their education. We asked her what curriculum she used to teach her children. That’s what I ordered.

Some of the things our children said they enjoyed about studying at home were:

“We would learn about another country, and then we would go there.”

“It was so easy to get from one country to another.”

I've Never Planned a Recognition Service! Now What?

I know who you are. I talk to someone just like you several times during spring recognition season. You’ve never planned or prepared a recognition service, and you have no idea where to start. You’re a tad bit overwhelmed with the idea of a formal service, and you’d just like a simple plan.

The good news is that you’re not alone. The even better news is that you can make a recognition service as simple (or as complicated) as you’d like to make it. As long as girls are being recognized for what they’ve learned and experienced this year in missions discipleship, you are on the right path!

Together, let’s plan a simple recognition service that will allow your GAs to be recognized for all their hard work this year.

Tips for Mentoring New Leaders

So, good news and real-talk news (because there is never any bad news when we talk about investing in someone’s life). Which one do you want first?

Let’s go with the good news first: The good news is that you have found your new leader! Yay! Give yourself a pat on the back for that one. Sometimes that’s the hardest part.

Now . . . real-talk news: You have to plan and be intentional about mentoring a new leader. Mentoring someone takes more than just a one-time effort. You’re in it for the long haul. So develop a plan of action.

While this is not an exhaustive list, to get off on a good foot and effectively engage in a mentoring relationship, you must have the right (1) mindset, (2) commitment, (3) availability and (4) integrity.

MK Schooling

We truly counted it a privilege to serve as International Mission Board (IMB) missionaries. Our family was blessed beyond measure, not only for the financial support, but for the spiritual and emotional support as well.

Our MK schooling story includes many moves. Serving in a restricted access country means that you don’t really know what might be next. God was faithful and led us every step of the way. We landed with a 2-year-old and an almost- 4-year-old. Our first year of language study by immersion had us balancing tutors, child care in our home and some kindergarten homeschooling. The lessons and creative arts gave us a needed routine for the day. And it was fun! Little sister even got her own sheets to color, and almost every day we had a fun family time of interacting with something new.

There Are 5 Seasons?

In elementary school, I learned there are 4 seasons: spring, summer, fall and winter.

Working on the national WMU staff, I learned there are actually 5 seasons. You read correctly . . . 5!

What’s the fifth season I’m referring to? RECOGNITION SEASON!

It’s one of my favorite times of the year. I love it because it reminds me of when I was a GA and received my Mission Adventures badges in front of my church congregation. I remember feeling like the adults thought what I had learned and had to say about the projects we did during the year was important. And I remember adults asking questions and wanting to see things I had done during the year. Empowering!

Your CMD 2018 Stories (Part 5)

We have more stories for you! Let's hear what children from across the country did for this year's Children's Missions Day to serve their communities.

GAs and RAs at Rice Memorial Baptist made valentines for the residents at an assisted living in Greenwood, South Carolina. They sang songs and gave their cards to each resident. The residents loved their visit and told them to come back again!” (For a glimpse of their awesome day, check out the photo to the right!)

— Kim Stackhouse, for the GAs and RAs at Rice Memorial Baptist Church in Greenwood, South Carolina

A Few Good Ideas

It’s March! But April’s coming!

April is just about here! With the new month comes Easter, the most holy of all days in the year. Boys and girls will be celebrating the Resurrection of our Savior Jesus Christ. The celebration will focus on how the grave and the cross are empty and how much our Savior loves us.

With the new month also comes a focus on North American missions. GAs, RAs and CAs will focus on the North American Mission Study and the Annie Armstrong Easter Offering. Leaders will encourage children to not only give to the offering but to learn ways the offering supports the work of those who serve in North America.

Your CMD 2018 Stories (Part 4)

We have more stories for you! Let's hear what children from across the country did for this year's Children's Missions Day to serve their communities.

“We collected money through Change Makes Sense program (offering for the Children in Action and Mission Friends programs) at our church on January 28 to fund our project. We purchased supplies for the project with this money. On February 14, all 17 children put together appreciation baskets for 8 local first responder agencies. On February 17, 9 of the children delivered the baskets to the 8 agencies and thanked them for their service to our community and encouraged them through prayers, love and support.” (For a glimpse of their baskets, see the photo to the right!)

— Jenna Bocock, for the Children in Action at First Baptist Church Ridgeway in Ridgeway, Virginia

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