Choose the Best

The Ox in the Ditch

My pastor tells the story of discovering the best over the better in a former church. Fairly new in the farming community, he arrived at 6:00 for evening services. He arrived, but no one else did. The building was empty at 5:45, 6:00 and even at 6:15. Discouraged, disgruntled and puzzled, he slowly started to his car. That’s when he saw the lights. Even a mile away on the flat country plains he could tell there were car lights, many car lights. Curious, he drove toward them.

What he found amazed him and then inspired him. Mr. Heiland’s fence was torn and his cows had gotten out. Some were on the road and others were grazing on the grass along the road. My pastor looked from one car to another and there he found his church. Every person he had expected to be at church was trying to help Mr. Heiland lead his cows back into their pasture.

Best Challenges Better

Which door should I go through? The popular television show Let’s Make a Deal serves as a reminder that none of us know for sure what is behind the curtain or beyond the door. Often in living our lives for God, we find safety in just staying where we are. That may be in church, in a position of leadership, or simply showing up and doing what we’re asked. After all, there is nothing inherently wrong with where we are. It’s better than doing nothing.

But living in the realm of better can blind us to the best. So what can we do?

1) Open our eyes to the range of possibilities available.

2) Prayerfully and honestly assess the better option and the best choice.

3) Do not be afraid to step out of our comfort zones. The best will always carry a little more risk. It may demand more from us than we are currently giving.

4) Trust God to support us in carrying out the best when better seems good enough.

“Do not be afraid; do not be discouraged, for the Lord your God will be with you wherever you go” (Joshua 1:9 NIV).

Good . . . Better . . . Best . . .

We all need new starts from time to time. For me though, I’m trusting for God’s good, God’s better, God’s best.

In other words, I’m done planning my own life.

My plans are always less than His plans. His plans are beyond my imagination.

My plans are based on what I know now. God knows the future.

My plans are really my own desires. God’s desires are pure and all encompassing.

My plans might be for my good. God’s plans are for the good of all people.

My plans are just for now. God’s plans are eternal.

I’m limited. God is limitless. His good, His better, His best.

So how will I know?

God will always show up in my time with Him in the Word. He will lead me through prayer. And He will speak to me through the counsel of godly family and friends. He will orchestrate events, open doors and close them, and allow sickness and health. He will continue to change me into His likeness. As I continue to turn to Him in every area of my life, I can trust that He is in control, do the next thing, and just live free.

Doing More Than Training Students to Be Christians

“Drexel is Different” proclaim billboards throughout Philadelphia, and Brian Musser, Baptist campus minister, couldn’t agree more.

Located in the heart of Philadelphia, Drexel University is home to a student population of more than 25,000 students.

Since he arrived on campus 11 years ago, Musser has not only established a Baptist presence but also helped several Christian organizations find a place at Drexel, which is important because “no one organization is going to reach the entire campus.”

As Mission Service Corps missionaries for the North American Mission Board, Musser and his wife, Jennifer, raise their own support. A diverse group of more than 100 churches in Philadelphia Baptist Association helps, but partnerships with other evangelical churches throughout Philadelphia are important.

Obedience: Always the Best Choice

In 2015, Jack and Melody Williams* left Benin, their home of 24 years, to reestablish an International Mission Board presence in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). Benin was not an easy place to live, but Melody Williams fell in love with the country and its people. The Williamses learned French, Benin’s official language, and Fon, a language spoken by about 1.2 million Beninese. Learning Fon helped Melody Williams lead many to Christ.

The grief of leaving behind friends and ministry partners in Benin still lingers, but the Williamses are not only seeing a tremendous work of God in DRC but also being content with difficulties for Christ’s sake.

Though DRC is considered a “reached” nation because 80% of the population claims Christianity, some of its evangelical churches have been corrupted by the influence of animism, spiritism, witchcraft, and sorcery.

“During a war, those who had known Christ did not pass on their faith and teachings on repentance, surrender, and the cost of discipleship,” Melody Williams said.

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