Girls in Action

Turning a Ministry Project into a Missions Project

As a Girls in Action leader, it can be challenging to plan projects that give GAs the opportunity to take the lessons they have learned during their GA meetings and apply them to the needs in their community. It can be especially challenging to make sure the majority of the projects are missions projects and not simply ministry projects.

You may ask, “What is the difference between the two?” Missions is sharing the gospel in words and through actions. A missionary is someone who goes into the world to share the gospel. A missions project is an opportunity to share the good news that God loves the person you are helping.

How can leaders help girls develop a missional lifestyle?

I have a confession: I’m not perfect. There, I said it. Even though I was a pastor’s child, a GA, and a pretty good girl, I still didn’t understand what it meant to live on mission with God. I know my leaders meant well, but this is what I walked away with as a teen:

  • I need to read my Bible.
  • My friends are lost, and if I don’t make sure they are saved, it’s my fault if they go you know where.
  • If I have problems, I need to pray.

Not all bad things, but it didn’t compel me to fulfill the Great Commission either. Don’t get me wrong—I loved hearing the stories, I learned about Lottie Moon, and for heaven’s sake, I was the 1995 Associational GA Princess (What, what!). But there was still something missing.

Helping someone develop a missional lifestyle doesn’t start in the mind; it begins in the heart. Below you will find four tips to help you develop a strategy to engage girls in cultivating a missional lifestyle.

Number One: Set Goals.

GA Groups in Small Churches

There are always two sides to a coin. While some see a small church as a disadvantage to missions discipleship, it can be a strength that creates an effective GA ministry.

Small groups can allow for more meaningful discussion times. As questions and issues arise, leaders have the chance to address each concern. This allows for more significant discussions, as well as cultivating a leader’s ability to guide girls into a deeper understanding of their world and missions. At times, there may be an activity that requires more participants than a group has available. The leader could adapt the game to fit a smaller number of people, but be sure to keep the intent. Or better yet, the leader could use this as an opportunity to invite a women or men’s class to come play with her GAs.

One of the greatest strengths of a smaller church is the longevity of its members. This dynamic allows leaders to watch their GA girls grow up to become leaders themselves with a great opportunity for influence in future generations.

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