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Growing Through Hands-On Missions

In a conversation with a friend not too long ago, she shared that her Women on Mission group had been collecting items for a local ministry. Once all the donations had been collected, the facilitator said she would drop the items off on behalf of the women. Some of the younger women spoke up to say they wanted to assist in taking the items because they wanted to see and experience the ministry themselves.

Seeing the benefit of people becoming part of a ministry is key to promoting missions and growing a missions organization. With daytimes that are filled to the brim, women are no longer excited to attend a missions meeting to just “read a part” in a missions magazine.

Communicating Effectively

My best friend and I don’t get to see each other often, but we make a point to regularly keep in touch either by phone, messaging, or lunches together. A card from her in my mailbox reminds me that I am important to her and that she is thinking about me.

Through my years as a WMU leader, I have found that consistent communication with my leadership team is just as important. When I visit a Mission Friends class as the teacher is setting up for the lesson that evening, we have the opportunity to share our hearts for those preschoolers and how we are reaching them. A snail mail card sent saying, “I appreciate you,” or a Facebook message lets my teachers know they are important to me and to the ministry of our church.

I Can’t Do It All

How many times do we try to do it all when we take on a leadership role? One thing I’ve learned over the years is that I can’t do it all. So if I can’t do it all, what can I do to accomplish what I would like to as a leader?

Delegate. When I ask others to serve with me or give them a portion of an assignment, it frees me up to focus on other parts of my leadership role. The most important thing is when I give someone else a responsibility I have to leave it with her and trust her to do it. I have to show the person that I believe in her and her way of doing it. If I go back and try to fix what she did or take the task back once I’ve delegated it, then I have failed. That shows I really did not want to delegate at all. Saying I’m going to delegate and then actually doing it and assigning someone the task is not always easy but something I’ve learned over the years. And it’s perfectly okay if she doesn’t do it exactly the way I would do it!

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