Lottie Moon

Lottie Moon

Nacida en Virginia el 12 de diciembre de 1840, Charlotte Digges Moon creció a ser una mujer bien educada y culta. En el año 1873, durante un sermón en su iglesia, ella se dio cuenta de su llamado a China para testificar del evangelio. El 7 de julio de 1873 la Junta de Misiones Foráneas (ahora la Junta de Misiones Internacionales) de la Convención Bautista del Sur la nombró como misionera a China, y en el otoño de aquel año ella salió para Tengchow. Lottie pasó la mayoría de sus años misioneros en Tengchow y P’ingtu, donde enseñó en las escuelas misioneras y ministró a las mujeres. Eventualmente adoptó la ropa china y aprendió el idioma chino. Al sumergirse en la cultura china, Lottie ganó el respeto de muchas personas chinas y su obra misionera alcanzó a mucha gente para Cristo.

Missions for Advent

I love Christmas, especially now that I’ve learned to pull back and focus more on the eternal gift of Christmas. Incorporating Advent practices into our family’s celebration was the turning point.

This year, I added an international missions emphasis. Our weekly Advent prayers included 2 of the missionaries featured in the Week of Prayer for International Missions prayer brochure.

Prayers flow into action. Invite your friends and neighbors to a WorldCrafts party. Consider hosting the Intriguing Indonesia party since Indonesia is the focus of this year’s International Mission Study. VisitWorldCrafts.org/parties.asp for everything you need to introduce your friends and neighbors to this country and this WMU ministry that develops sustainable, fair-trade businesses among impoverished people around the world.

Prayers, action, and joyful giving draw the season to a close. A bountiful Lottie Moon Christmas Offering for International Missions is the result. The heavens sing, and God multiplies it all for good.

Lucretia Mobbs loves this season of light.

Learning, Praying, Giving, Going

Do you know all the different ways that the Lottie Moon Christmas Offering helps missionaries? Below are just a few of the ways that the Christmas offering has helped Jacob and Robin Talley as they serve in Indonesia:

Missions Matters!

Sometimes it “pays” to look down. This is one way our family finds extra funds for the Lottie Moon Christmas Offering.

When our children were young, we began the tradition of depositing any money found throughout the year into our Mission Jar. This included money discovered in the pockets of clothing to be washed, in vehicle seats, between couch cushions, and especially lying on sidewalks—I once stumbled across $7 this way! In December, we would take our money to a coin changer and include the total in our missions offering.

While our Mission Jar was a family project, it is always interesting to discover the creative ways churches publicize the international missions emphasis. My friend Sue’s church makes Lottie Moon come alive for young children by displaying a life-size cutout of Ms. Lottie and allowing the youngsters to compare their own size to this diminutive missionary to China.

Christmas Traditions

Growing up in Mission Friends, Girls in Action, and Acteens, I can’t remember a time in my life when I didn’t know about Lottie Moon or the Lottie Moon Christmas Offering for International Missions. Giving to this special offering each year is just as much a part of my Christmas traditions as decorating my house, baking holiday treats, and caroling with family and friends!

While Lottie Moon will forever be my “missions hero,” she was very much like the missionaries serving around the world today. She heard God’s call to go to China, and she obeyed. For 39 years, Lottie faithfully lived among the Chinese people and shared the love of Jesus with them.

While there, she wrote numerous letters home asking Southern Baptists for their support through prayer, financial gifts, and missions involvement. As a result, Southern Baptists gave enough money to send three more missionaries to China.

To honor Lottie Moon and her missions efforts, the Lottie Moon Christmas Offering for International Missions is collected each year at Christmastime. The entire offering—100 %— directly helps missionaries around the world tell all God’s children about Jesus!

Eight Things You Need to Know About Lottie Moon

Many people in our Baptist churches ask each year, “Who is Lottie Moon?” Others have been giving money in her honor for so many years they ask, “When will ‘the debt’ to her ever be paid?”

Let’s learn a few things about Lottie Moon.

Christmas and Missions

Growing up in a Baptist church there are two distinct times of the year that I remember different looking offering envelopes in the back of the church pews. It was around Christmas and Easter. These special offerings are named for two past servants of Jesus on the missions field, abroad and at home—Lottie Moon and Annie Armstrong. These two offerings then and today provide for the missionaries who serve “at home” (North American Mission Board, or NAMB) and “abroad” (International Mission Board, or IMB).

During December, WMU® provides an excellent resource to intentionally explore an international missions field and its needs. This year the focus is Indonesia. I am super excited about the literature and resources they have available to explore all the areas of this country; it will be like taking a trip minus the airfare.

Make a Difference in Your Church’s Giving

There’s a lot of talk about ways churches can increase the Lottie Moon Christmas Offering this year. With that in mind, consider this 10–step plan any congregation can incorporate that will ensure their Lottie Moon Christmas Offering will make an internal impact on those who are ministered to, those who give, and those who go.

Begin making a difference in your church’s giving by:

Mission Friends and the Holidays

So, what does your December schedule look like? If you are like most Mission Friends leaders, you are probably looking at a church calendar with at least two fewer Mission Friends sessions than usual. There are many ways to get creative in completing your Mission Friends unit and the International Mission Study in the month of December.

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