Adults on Mission

Why Wait?

Do you wait well? Or do you give up quickly if the line is long, the results aren’t immediate, or a prayer isn’t answered? Sometimes the fulfillment of even a God-given vision takes more time than expected and tests our capacity to persevere.

I have been inspired by the perseverance of my friend Doug as I have watched him hold fast and “chase after” his God-sent dream. For several years, Doug, a local architect with a young family and church leadership role, has vigilantly pursued his vision for a children’s interactive Bible museum in our city.

He has patiently (or not!) sought support, funding, and possible locations while gathering a creative leadership team to provide counsel and a support base to brainstorm and bounce off ideas about decision making. He has also developed extensive plans and story themes while pursuing community dialogue and involvement from local citizens and churches.

Trading Up: Hurt for Healing

Trading Up: Bible Stories That Move Us from Pain to Peace

Bartering was popular when I was a young mother. That was the way we often managed to have better clothes for our children, haircuts, music lessons, or even luxuries such as massages. The idea was to trade with your friends: your talents for their knowledge, your professional skills (i.e., hairdresser) for theirs (i.e., masseuse). Oftentimes we knew we had really “traded up.” We were thrilled with our bargaining powers.

The plan was our way of taking what we had and trading it for what we needed. Using this same principle, Janet Erwin and Murselle McMillan wrote Trading Up: Bible Stories That Move Us from Pain to Peace. This WMU resource is designed, through the use of Bible stories and study guides, to help victims of post-traumatic stress disorder trade up: fear traded for hope, anger for forgiveness, and guilt for truth. Giving pain up to God and receiving His gift of healing in return is trading up at its best.

Called to Action

I love being active. I love playing sports and games, exploring new neighborhoods, and doing hands-on projects that show others love and compassion. This call to action is apparent in our Christian life in many ways. Nowhere in Scripture are we told to sit tight and watch the work of the Lord. We are called to take up our cross and follow the Lord—through action. This is great news! We get to be an active part of God’s plan for His people.

For many years, I’ve been active in missions, taking trips to places like Thailand, Haiti, and even Iowa, but God has more often and with more impact called me to action in the places I have lived. There is nothing like the joy of seeing a friend or neighbor come to know Christ. There is greater love shared through continuous relationship with those hurting around us.

Simple Love Goes a Long Way

Three weeks after I moved into my new apartment, I met Kana. Kana and her daughter had just moved in across the hall. The immigrant single mom had recently lost her job and didn’t have much outside support.

After a couple of “hellos” in passing, Kana and I ran into each other one day as she was looking for a job. We had a long conversation about her recent hardships and how discouraged she was; she also expressed deep gratitude for her new home and how she hoped this was a starting point for her and her little girl. As I stood and listened, I realized how much she needed the love and support of a family. I told her about my church and how much it means to me to have a church family to support me when things are hard.

Group Styles

Adults on Mission functions primarily through informal small groups whose members seek to accomplish God’s missions purpose in the world. While Adults on Mission groups relate to all of the WMU objectives, one or more of the objectives may be chosen as a special focus of a group.

Adults on Mission groups usually exist for one year. At the end of the year, group members determine if the group will continue and/or have the same objective. If continued, then group members have the option of continuing or selecting a different group in which to participate.

The meetings and activities of Adults on Mission groups can take on many forms depending on the audience or target group. Groups may choose a group name, which helps identify the group, especially when there is more than one Adults on Mission group in a church.

Key Elements of Adults on Mission

Resources for Adults on Mission

When you think about all the activities life has to offer, why would an adult choose to make missions participation a priority? What causes an individual to set aside personal preferences, invest energy and time in working in often less than desirable circumstances, and even make financial commitments that require a reassessment of what is necessary versus what is just wanted?

Adults today have demanding schedules, active lives, and many opportunities to “go and do.” A commitment to involvement in missions is an answer to God’s call on their lives. It is answering the call to salvation and service in Christ’s name.

Try these resources for additional information and options for integrating missions into your church and home.


Adults on Mission PowerPoint

Adults on Mission Promo Flyer

Adults on Mission Worksheet

The Load Unbundled

By Kimberly Hart

Are you struggling to carry a heavy load? Here are some tips for carrying a man-sized load:

  • Know what needs to be hauled.
  • Consider the distance and destination.
  • Lay aside additional weight.
  • Determine who or what can help.
  • Consult owner for special instructions.

So how do you carry a cross—see notes above. The instruction given by Jesus in Luke 9:23 to carry our cross can be hard to understand. The meaning can be lost in “churchy” language. It can also be clouded by the world’s idea that anything rough is a cross to bear.

Share His Light: Ministering with Others to Others

By: Gail Veale

Looking for a ministry and someone to serve with you? There are many opportunities in your community to share and spread the light and love of Christ.

Prayer and Passion

Pray for God to reveal your passions. Reflect on how you have served in the past and the blessings you gave and received. Ask God to open doors and then follow His leading.

Two by Two

As Jesus sent out His followers in groups of 2 (see Luke 10:1–2), you can pray for and seek out someone to minister with you. Two neighbors visited my mother-in-law recently and brought her flowers from their yard. They stayed only a few minutes, but the impact was long lasting!

Bright Light Sites

You can begin your search for a ministry to plug into at wmu.com/ministries. Are you passionate about serving struggling people in your community? Then volunteer with your local Christian Women’s Job Corps or Christian Men’s Job Corps site and help women and men gain job skills and life skills.

Adults on Mission Bookmarks

Get your Adults on Mission group together, and enjoy a fun, easy activity. 

  1. Choose suitable paper. Select a heavy cardstock-like paper to act as the support for your bookmark.
  2. Download bookmark template below.
  3. Print bookmark to size of your choose. 
    • If you have the printer capability, choose "print on both sides."
    • If not, print bookmark as normal.
  4. Cut the bookmark to template size. If necessary, glue front and back together.
  5. Take home and enjoy!

Bookmark template (pdf)

 

 

Voices of Annie

Each year as Easter rolls around, I look forward to hearing the voices of Annie. Some of the voices are male, others female. Some speak with a heavy French accent, others with a southern twang like me, yet others with a western drawl. Each voice is sweet and strong, speaking passionately about how God is using him or her to fulfill His work in North America.

These are the voices of North American Mission Board missionaries supported through the Annie Armstrong Easter Offering, telling their stories on videos provided by NAMB.

To view the many videos, visit AnnieArmstrong.com. Prayerfully select the videos to share with your group.

Kimberly Sowell reaches thousands of women through her speaking and writing ministry. Visit KimberlySowell.com for more information.

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