WMU Blog

God’s Word Tells Us How to Respond to Refugees

Bible with journal

Who is a refugee? Merriam-Webster Dictionary defines refugee as “one that flees for safety; especially one who flees to a foreign country or power to escape danger or persecution.” Therefore, refugees are immigrants who seek asylum either for ethnic or religious reasons or are driven away from their home by natural disasters. Nonetheless, they have become foreigners in a new place.

Report on What God Is Doing through WMU

antique typewriter

When I was in journalism school, I was told, “Don’t tell me. Show me.” And no, I wasn’t majoring in broadcast journalism or photojournalism.

What my professors wanted me to do as I wrote newspaper, magazine, or website articles was to be descriptive, using active verbs and strong nouns and avoiding superfluous adjectives and adverbs. They wanted just the facts, but they wanted the facts to be presented in a way that would capture the audience’s attention.

As you prepare your end-of-the-year report for your church, keep this idea of showing— not just telling—in mind. Think of your report as an opportunity to celebrate what God did through WMU over the past year and inspire others to get involved in missions through WMU in the year to come.

Your Assignment

First, gather the facts:

Mission Friends Teachers Summer Camp - Day 3

Now We're Cooking!

S’mores are a must at camp! We share a recipe below for making s’mores with your preschoolers, and a fire is not necessary. Try it with your Mission Friends!

Cooking with preschoolers is a lot of fun. One cooking or tasting activity is usually included each month in Mission Friends. These are good learning experiences as the cooking activities relate to the missions areas. Use these activities as opportunities to talk about the missions areas and the missionaries’ work. Always post the Allergy Alert Chart to keep preschoolers safe. Read today’s free printable page, Cooking with Preschoolers, for tips on cooking activities with your preschoolers.
 

Moving Our Nets

man casting a net at sunset

Writing comes naturally to me. Pen on paper or fingers on the keyboard, when an idea comes to mind and I’m fleshing out an article or blog post, I’m in the zone.

What I’m learning the longer I follow God though is that He is one storyteller I will never be able to match. Try as I might to write my own story, in reality, God continually asks me to give Him the pen instead. While most days it’s hard, when I remember what He’s done, I can’t help but surrender.

I think back on how this 4-year journey that began with me coming to South Asia as a college student with a God-given desire to go overseas is ending with me leaving as an adult with a hunger to tell the gospel to anyone who has 2 ears and will listen.

God calls all of us to step out in faith and do new things so that the gospel would multiply to every nation, tribe, and language. Whether it’s across the street or across the world, the gospel is the greatest story ever told that so many have yet to hear.

Welcome to the “Big Top”

Come one, come all. Step right up to the main event—a new year in missions!

As you warm up for this year's Unshakable act, your pre-show checklist might look a little like mine:

  • decorate the meeting space
  • purchase materials
  • organize supplies
  • study the lesson
  • schedule monthly missions projects

All of these things are very important and will help ensure a smooth start. But, before the show can begin, it's important to consider ways you can prepare your heart to welcome a diverse group of kids to an exciting year of missions learning and action.

It's easy to appear ready on the outside; but if you haven't prepared yourself on the inside to communicate love with the children you lead, you may miss out on valuable opportunities to share the real reason why you do what you do each week. Will your actions and attitudes enable each child to know Jesus and be burdened for those who don't?

Welcome kids to the "Big Top" with these performance tips as you lead each week:

Mission Friends Teachers Summer Camp - Day 2

Missions and Magnificent Views

An awesome part of camp is hiking along the trails to see the magnificent views! The scenery is beautiful as you hike along a stream, look across the mountains, view rock formations, or look up at trees. Be sure to take your binoculars!

 

Using Pictures with Preschoolers

As you teach preschoolers in Mission Friends, help them to see the views along the way. Since preschoolers are such visual learners, the Mission Friends Resource Kit and Pictures helps them see pictures of the missionaries and the places where they serve. The pictures open preschoolers’ eyes to people around the world. Use the pictures to help you make preparation easier and become more effective as a teacher.

Read our free download Using Pictures with Preschoolers to learn a variety of ways to use pictures as you teach preschoolers.

Mission Friends Teachers Summer Camp - Day 1

Welcome to Summer Camp for Mission Friends Teachers

Welcome to Summer Camp for Mission Friends Teachers!

Every day this week, Summer Camp for Mission Friends Teachers will be a fun way to give you some extras to help you get ready for the upcoming year in Mission Friends. We'll share things you can download and use in your Mission Friends class, and give you ideas for games and activities for your preschoolers. Visit us on Facebook every day this week for something new at Summer Camp!

On the first day of real camp, there are games and fun ways to get to know others. For our first day of Mission Friends Summer Camp, we share ways to get to know your Mission Friends. When the new year of Mission Friends starts, you may have new preschoolers in your class. Or you may be a new Mission Friends teacher and need some quick ways to get to know preschoolers in your class. Or you may be a new Mission Friends teacher and need some quick ways to get to know preschoolers' names.

Caring for a Foster Child at Church

heart in hands

My heart melted. I felt two little arms wrap around my legs in a hug as I stood helping parents get their preschoolers’ belongings at the close of our Mission Friends session. I looked down and saw the brightest smile on her sweet face looking up at me. My heart was so touched because this was her first time to come to Mission Friends, and the first time she had ever seen me. All I knew about her was that she was a foster child and 3 years old. Monica* had come to live with a dedicated family in our church who serves as a foster family.

New Faces, New Disciples

South Asian people

Living in a city of 12 million people means you see new faces all the time. Unlike in the United States, where I can almost guarantee I’ll run into someone I know in the grocery store, it’s a rarity to see the same person twice in South Asia.

This plethora of new faces is not just a number but people who need to hear and respond to the gospel. It’s an opportunity for discipleship to begin with those who need it most.

For example, take Priya*. She’s a nursing student whom I met a year and a half ago. At that time, my teammates and I were leading her and her first-year classmates in a Bible study on discipleship. It was our prayer that several girls from this study would want to lead the next group of “first years” in the same Bible study during the next school year.

We began praying and talked with the girls to see who would be interested in knowing more about being a leader. To our surprise, Priya was one of the girls who was interested. She was one of the more soft-spoken girls participating in the Bible study and not one we thought of as a leader.

To Be or Not to Be

From Greece to the present day, actors and actresses have worn masks during performances to transition from one character to another. During Elizabethan days, one actor could portray various parts of a play simply by wearing a different mask on the stage.

While we don’t wear physical masks as we go through daily life, some of us nevertheless mask the feelings, thoughts, and even pain we are carrying around on the inside.

Recently, I was talking with a friend about a member of her family. Her family member is struggling with the consequences of a decision made years ago. From all outward appearances, the family member seems well adjusted and seems to have their life together. However, behind the appearance—behind the mask they are wearing—is a huge amount of pain and suffering few know about.

While my job as an editor and writer often requires me to share personal experiences, I tend to be more private about my personal life. No, I don’t hold a mask in front of my face. But, I am an expert at disguising what’s really happening inside.

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