WMU Blog

The Thread of the Gospel

Quilting runs in our family. Our girls will inherit quilts made by their great-great-grandparents, which I tend to think is a neat concept. An old quilt can somehow make a person feel right at home. Through the years, the fabric gets soft but the threads hold together. Each piece was sewn together uniquely by hand or machine—using fabric our grandparents and great-grandparents probably had as scraps from an old dress or shirt. A quality quilt will last for generations.

In the same regard, sharing our story of how the gospel has affected our lives has been passed down to us from someone else and is a unique story we share with others.

Second Peter 1:3 gives us assurance that “His divine power has granted to us all things that pertain to life and godliness, through the knowledge of him who called us to his own glory and excellence.”

Focus on WMU: It’s about Missions

Focus on WMU is not about WMU. It’s about missions. It’s about the work of God through the church by which the gospel of Jesus Christ is extended in word and deed to all the people in the world.

WMU is just a vehicle through which Christian believers can “understand and be radically involved” in the work of God. It encourages participation in the work of the church and denomination. It aids in developing spiritually toward a missions lifestyle, which includes learning about missions, praying for missions, giving to missions, serving in missions, and supporting missions.

Use Your Strengths to Reach Others in Your Workplace

When you look around your workplace, what do you see? Or rather, whom do you see?

You probably see people with various backgrounds and personalities. Some you may identify with and others you may find quite different from you. But do you see your workplace as brimming with outreach opportunities? After all, your workplace is probably where you spend most of your time second only to your home.

So how do you build relationships with people at work? There are nuances involved in work relationships such as trust and support. The key to navigating these nuances is to know your strengths and understand others’ strengths.

Start by taking a test to determine your strengths and different aspects of your personality. Think on each of your strengths and traits and take some time to write out ways you can use your strengths to build relationships with others. You don’t have to have almost all relationship-building strengths in order to accomplish that. All you have to do is work through different nuances with your co-workers by combining your strengths with theirs.

Lead with Confidence

As a small child, I was afraid to go to the counter at a fast food restaurant to ask for a drink refill. I hated it so much. I couldn't tell you why—the people behind the counter didn't have a reason to refuse me a free refill. And I highly doubt the scenarios of humiliation I pictured in my head would have ever happened in real life. Nevertheless, I was too shy. My parents would usually make me go anyway; otherwise, I wouldn't get a refill. I’m thankful to them now for trying to get me to be less shy, although I'm certain I didn't appreciate it at the time!

When I was in school, I had so many opportunities to speak up and answer questions posed by my teachers. I probably only spoke up about 15 percent of the time. I felt a desire to raise my hand when I thought I knew the answer, but I didn't want to risk being incorrect and humiliating myself. As it happens, I usually had the correct answer and would be disappointed that I didn't speak up. But I couldn't risk it, right?

Focus on WMU "by All Means"

I remember so vividly my years as a GA. I enjoyed learning about missions, praying for missions, giving to missions, and doing missions. It was in Girls in Action that I learned about the Cooperative Program and how the Annie Armstrong Easter Offering and the Lottie Moon Christmas Offering support missionaries. GA was my window to the world.

As an adult, I knew the impact WMU missions organizations had had on my life and I so desired that my daughters would also have that biblical worldview. I became a GA leader before my daughters were in the first through sixth grade. It was such a joy seeing the gospel come to life for them as we learned about missions in GA.

Throughout GA and all the other WMU missions organizations, you will find the following 6 objectives in the curriculum and other resources:

Extending the Story

Extend the story of I Can Do It! through activities related to the story. As you read the book with preschoolers, use these activity ideas with your Mission Friends® to continue learning about the concepts in the book.

Beat the Wintertime Blues: Plan a Cool Missions Event

Here in the Deep South, we have been experiencing some unusually frigid days this past week. For this Goldilocks-type girl—you know, not too hot, not too cold—the sub-freezing temperatures make me want to stay indoors, all bundled up in my sweats and furry socks in front of a warm, crackling fire. It's even been too cold for my "It's-not-cold-I-wear-shorts-all-year-long" 12-year-old son. Needless to say, he has a bad case of cabin fever and can't wait to get outside to ride that new bike he got for Christmas.

On Campus Yet in the World: 5 Missions Opportunities for College Students in 2018

Happy New Year! It’s officially 2018. As you begin to think about all that’s in store this year, is God nudging you to become more involved in sharing His story with others locally, nationally, and globally? With another semester upon you, it may be difficult to see beyond the next couple of weeks. But God can use this season of your life to spread the good news among those who desperately need to hear it. Whether you have a weekend, an entire semester, or a long-term opportunity on your heart, check out these ways to use your time as a student to further the kingdom of God:

Weeklong/Weekend Missions Trips

Ask God to show you opportunities to share His love with others. Learn about the needs of people around you and how missions trips could be a tool for you to meet those needs, beginning with a week or a weekend. Plant seeds of the gospel in the hearts of those you serve by explaining why you care and want to help. Look for opportunities to expand your conversations and share about the hope Jesus offers.

Outreach—a way of life and who we are

Ryan and Seané Rice’s lives revolve around relationships with people. “Living in New Orleans as a church planter is all about building relationships with people. In fact, this is what our city is all about,” says Ryan. Though Ryan grew up loving VBS and Sunday School as a kid, when he got older, he stopped going and, even disliked the idea of church. He started to go his own way and, in his words, became his “own sort of god.” When he met his wife in college, Ryan began to slowly take the truth of the gospel seriously. Seané would invite him to church and, of course, he tagged along.

Develop: Changing the Way WMU Leaders Are Trained

As technology has changed, it has changed the way educational classes can be delivered. While many still enjoy the traditional classroom setting with a teacher and the camaraderie of other students, some need options that allow them to learn on their own schedule. I am one of those learners.

I have taken courses through Develop, WMU’s online and on-demand leadership training. While leadership conferences are still offered by national WMU, state WMUs, and associations, Develop’s courses extend the availability for leadership training to anyone with a computer at any time of the day or night. I have worked on courses at all hours, both on my computer and on my smartphone.

I appreciate that all Develop courses are reasonably priced and provide opportunity for interactive learning. Courses are self-paced and designed to be completed in about 4 hours. Each Develop course is a stand-alone module with a month to complete the work. The deadline provided me with motivation to get finished in a reasonable amount of time yet without too much time pressure.

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