WMU Blog

Missional Engagement for All Ages

Becoming lifelong learners is an important quality among today’s missional leaders. Mindful of the various ways people learn, we strive to create an environment at WMU where staff members are encouraged to read and explore new ways to catch the attention of each new generation to raise the priority of missions in our churches.

Recent business journals have been carrying information about the growing reality of four generations now working side by side in the workplace. In addition, the possibility of a fifth generation is coming soon if the retirement age continues to be extended. At WMU, we recognize the advantage we have of reaching all ages since this describes the breakdown of our employees—four generations presently employed at WMU. We are positioned well for collaboration as we seek to create relevant approaches that fit the makeup of today’s church.

Recently we had a presentation for staff on the various characteristics of generations; it reminded us not only of generational preferences and learning styles but also of the need to create entry points appropriate to each generation.

Waiting for an Invitation

This month, both state and national WMU staff are gathering in Albuquerque, New Mexico, for a time of leadership development and missions training. The Western Regional Leadership Summit is the result of months of praying and thinking together about ways to increase missions awareness and involvement in churches in our western states. We are grateful for the support of Del Norte Baptist Church, New Mexico WMU, and convention staff and volunteers who so willingly agreed to host this first unique gathering of western missions leaders. I hope you are planning to join us!

Together We Make a Difference

January is recognized as Human Trafficking Awareness Month. Every day, countless numbers of girls are trapped into a life of slavery either by force, by fraud, or with a promise of a better life that never comes. WMU has focused attention on this issue for several years through Project HELP and WorldCrafts in hopes of creating avenues of awareness and prevention. Many local and state WMU organizations have risen to the challenge and are doing incredible things to rid our society of this tragedy. You are to be commended for all your efforts.

I Can’t Do It All

How many times do we try to do it all when we take on a leadership role? One thing I’ve learned over the years is that I can’t do it all. So if I can’t do it all, what can I do to accomplish what I would like to as a leader?

Delegate. When I ask others to serve with me or give them a portion of an assignment, it frees me up to focus on other parts of my leadership role. The most important thing is when I give someone else a responsibility I have to leave it with her and trust her to do it. I have to show the person that I believe in her and her way of doing it. If I go back and try to fix what she did or take the task back once I’ve delegated it, then I have failed. That shows I really did not want to delegate at all. Saying I’m going to delegate and then actually doing it and assigning someone the task is not always easy but something I’ve learned over the years. And it’s perfectly okay if she doesn’t do it exactly the way I would do it!

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