Women on Mission

Simple Hospitality

Bill and Betty were a sweet couple in our church. Several years ago, Betty and I were involved in a mentoring group where she was my mentor.

Our times together were encouraging. Yet they were nothing elaborate. Betty just simply invited me into her home for conversation each week. We shared coffee and some of Bill’s fabulous desserts. He was quite the cook!

Just a few years ago, they both went to be with the Lord just 1 day apart. When I heard of their deaths, I was sad; however, God reminded me of their gracious hospitality and encouragement when I needed it the most.

He also reminded me that I need to find someone to whom I can show hospitality. I have such a great example of what that looks like, so I have no excuse. Will you join me in showing hospitality to someone today?

Hospitality on Mission

“Do not forget to show hospitality to strangers, for by so doing some people have shown hospitality to angels without knowing it” (Heb. 13:2).

Hospitality is often thought of as an event usually in someone’s home where people are entertained. However, hospitality goes so much deeper than that. Hospitality is an attitude of welcome. It does not matter what kind of home you own or how good a cook you are. It just means you welcome others with open arms.

How can you use hospitality in a missional way? It’s quite easy, actually. It’s as simple as inviting unsaved friends, family, or neighbors into your home. When people feel welcomed, they are more open to hearing about the gospel.

Provide them with a meal and conversation where you learn more about them and their needs. As you learn more about them, you can begin to share the gospel and relate it to their current situation in life.

Engaging New Members

Being the new person is not always easy, especially if you are prone to shyness. So it’s important that we as church members or members of a missions group be intentional in making new people feel welcome. How do you engage guests or new members in your church or missions group with hospitality?

Here are a few ways you can practice hospitality with them:

  • Smile—Greet guests and new members with a friendly smile. Let them know how glad you are to meet them.
  • Remember—Ask their name and find ways to remember it. When you see them again, you’ll be able to call them by name.
  • Connect—Find a point of connection. Maybe you both enjoy the same hobbies or share similar tastes in food.
  • Encourage—Offer a word of encouragement and let them know they are welcome in your church or group at any time.

Missionary Spotlight Update: George and Megan Lane*

“There are only a few believers in . . . 1 of the main villages we work in and the strongest believer is a 14-year-old kid named David*. He has only been saved a few years, but he is growing rapidly in his faith. He shares the gospel with some of his friends even though they don’t accept it and mock him some for it. He does not have electricity at his home, so when it gets dark there isn’t really anything he can do. But he has the New Testament on an audio device so he listens to that from nightfall until he goes to sleep. He knows the Bible very well! He can quote from memory many parts of the Bible. Since he doesn’t have the Old Testament on audio (and he can’t read very well yet), George has been teaching him the Book of Exodus. After teaching about Moses and the burning bush and how the voice from the bush said, ‘I AM,’ George flipped over to John 8, when Jesus says that He is the ‘I AM.’ As George was reading in [the Zarma language], David was pretty much quoting the whole chapter from memory!”

*Names changed.

Hospitality Brings Jesus’ Love to Neighbors

Each day, the population of Phoenix and Tucson, Arizona, increases significantly. Phoenix grows by about 300 daily, or about 100,000 annually.

With only 1 Southern Baptist church for every 18,500 people, it is an ever-present challenge to get the message of Jesus Christ’s love to newcomers and the 5.49 million people already living in the metro area, said Monty Patton, a Send City missionary and founder and co-pastor of Mountain Ridge Church in Glendale, located northwest of Phoenix.

Patton works with sending churches and their church planters to establish ministries in Phoenix and Tucson. He; his wife, Nancy; their 2 daughters; and their son-in-law are all devoted to area church-planting efforts.

They have found that building relationships is essential in proclaiming Jesus Christ to the burgeoning masses—1 person at a time.

Simple Gestures Open Doors to Gospel

Mandy Wells prepares “memelas” (small tortillas brushed with bacon grease) with some national friends in Oaxaca, Mexico.

Sharing a meal or inviting someone into your home for coffee or water shows hospitality in this city of about 300,000. Though simple gestures, they create opportunities to establish friendships with indigenous people and share about Jesus Christ.

Wells and husband Jim are missionaries in an area of Oaxaca (pronounced wah-hah-cah). The couple and their 2 young children have been there 16 months.

“One thing that we really try to do is build friendships,” Mandy Wells said. “Whether people come to Christ or not after having heard the gospel, we will still be their friends and continue investing in their lives. . . . Simply spending time really getting to know people opens the doors for us to share the gospel with those around us.”

Neighborhood Barbecue: Open Doors to the Gospel

Community is not static. Busy lives, fences, and transient neighbors often hinder our ability to build close relationships with neighbors next door and down the street. Whether we live in an urban community or a rural setting, we can always benefit from learning about our neighbors. Growing neighbor relationships can aid in times of crisis, help celebrate successes, and encourage efforts to look out for each other’s homes and families. Good neighbor relationships can lead to close friendships as well as lives changed with the gospel.

In a day when a wave is the most contact we may have with neighbors, a neighborhood barbecue is one way to begin. Neighborhood get-togethers also provide opportunities to share the gospel and discover ministry needs.

Connecting with Children through Stories in VBS

“How is our church using stories in VBS [Vacation Bible School] to connect with children?” I asked our children’s minister, Ms. Alexia, through email. “Do you have a story to share?”

Reading her response, I sensed her excitement.

She explained that one year, all the children had gathered for their VBS daily missions experience. The screen on the wall displayed the computer slide presentation, and the props set the stage.

Gaining every child’s attention, the teacher began pouring her enthusiasm into each young heart about our church’s participation with Baptist Global Response’s Bucket Project. She shared how many Africans suffer with AIDS and that sometimes the buckets contain the only provisions those people receive throughout their illness.

One child, who had been adopted by a church family, suddenly stood and pointed at the picture on the screen. “My mom got a bucket just like that. We got one of your buckets.”

Saving Your Children through Life Stories

My daughter sat across the table from me, her forehead crinkling with confusion. “What do I do, Mom?”

Quiet hovered throughout the house this Sunday afternoon, with everyone else napping. I propped my elbows on the table. My thoughts twisted in every direction. How do I answer her? She’s 18, an adult now. I can’t say no, and I certainly can’t encourage her. She had been asked out on a date by someone she doesn’t really know, and she was conflicted on how to answer him.

Just as God passed along stories, the bad with the good, I’ve passed along my stories to my daughter—the bad with the good. She knows my teenage prodigal moments. She knows my story.

I touched her hand. “You don’t have to go.”

She saw right through to my heart, knowing my concern for her—my concern for her to learn from my bad and be the wiser. “What if I tell him that I’d like to get to know him better before I go on a date with him?”

“That would be wise.”

“Mom, I’m so glad I can talk to you.”

His Schedule

Reading the church newsletter, Brenda sighed. In addition to the usual activities, a baby shower, a workday, a preview of the upcoming Easter music, and a new ladies’ Bible study were scheduled.

“Lord, with work and family responsibilities, how can I do all this?” she moaned. Gently, she sensed the Lord saying, “Let me, not the church calendar, plan your schedule.”

Brenda had been considering a local service project that could use her skills and provide interaction with unbelievers. Realizing God was leading her to revamp her schedule, she decided to bow out of choir, skip the workday, and forgo the Bible study.

When she received some critical remarks for lessening her church involvement, she lovingly explained her actions. With freed-up time, she began kingdom-building relationships in her community.

By Ann Maniscalco

 

 

 

 

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