Women on Mission

Praying for Guatemala

“We were praying over a Guatemalan town. It had a very small and weak evangelical presence,” shared Mark Fricke, an International Mission Board missionary to Guatemala for 22 years, “and was very well known for its syncretism stronghold—mixing of religion with ancestral beliefs and traditions. Their beliefs are centered on working to gain salvation and to please or honor a saint or spirit.”

Fricke and his team began asking God to work and send someone who would plant himself or herself there as His witness. They prayerwalked and volunteer teams from the United States came, working and praying in that area with them, as well.

“Sometimes we would take 3 steps forward and 2 back. But we [kept] praying faithfully, even when answers didn’t come.” They knew fighting this type of battle could be done only on their knees. And they praised God, believing that He loved those people and had a plan He was working out for their good and His glory.

The answer came.

Pushing Past the Honeymoon Stage of a Church Plant

No church bells rang at that time. But George and Janelle Lim fell in love with Glastonbury, Connecticut, years ago. Finally called to plant a church there, they moved their family of 5 in August 2015.

“Living here was surreal,” George Lim shared. “Like most missions, we hit the ground in the honeymoon stage. Yet a few months later, we were back to reality. Like most of New England, this is spiritually hard ground. Glastonbury is an affluent and educated town. People in this community have all the material things they need.

“By October, we were lonely, tired, discouraged, and without resources to accomplish what God called us to—plant a church. A friend said, ‘Let’s stop talking about how hard the ground is and start talking about how great our God is.’

“Crying out to God, we remembered our purpose: to make much of Jesus, to bring people to Jesus, not to do something cool or to be known as church planters. Furthermore we recognized that when we do too much in our strength, the natural response is to take credit. But times of complete weakness [are opportunities] to see God’s power and for Him alone to be glorified.

Missionary Spotlight Update: Steve and Jen Hagen

Jen Hagen reported that a partner, George*, in the mountains has a heart for an unengaged, unreached tribal group and the Hagens have been praying for a way to engage this group. They recently discovered that 2 men from a “great organization” have been trying to get into the area to reach this very group. The men have been denied access and George is trying to help them get permission to enter that area. “Will you pray with us for wisdom for these guys as they try to gain entrance and for favor with the officials?” Jen Hagen asked.

The Hagens have prayed for at least 7 years to find a way to help the Agta tribal people develop new sources of income to combat their extreme poverty. A few months ago, they came into contact with an American family who had just come to the mountain area to develop livelihood projects for tribal people. Through a series of circumstances, this family has decided to partner with the Hagens full time. Praise God for this answer to prayer. Pray for this family as they adjust to life in the Philippines, develop relationships with the tribal people, and discover what projects would be the most effective for the Agta people.

Free Prayer: Go and Give It

We know that prayer should be the backbone of every undertaking of the believer and the church. But can prayer also be an outreach ministry?

Absolutely! In fact, it might create an opportunity for telling people about the love, forgiveness, and salvation that Christ Jesus gives.

Generally nonbelievers welcome prayer for themselves and others within their circle of concern.

“Prayer is the key to making spiritual inroads,” said Mark Wakefield, chaplaincy strategist with the Alabama Baptist State Board of Missions (SBOM).

For a prayer outreach ministry to be effective, it should be done in places where people gather, such as NASCAR races at the Talladega Superspeedway in Alabama. Wakefield said volunteers with Alabama Raceway Ministries (ARM)—an outreach of the SBOM—assist race fans and others at the speedway, engage them in conversation, pray with them, and, when the opportunity arises, tell them about Jesus.

Though ARM is geared for a raceway environment, its concept is adaptable to other situations: arts and crafts fairs, bridal shows, festivals, car shows, motorcycle rallies—the possibilities abound!

5 Questions to Start a New Year of Missions

Welcome to a new church year and a new year for your adult missions group! Just as January 1 brings the feeling of a fresh start, the beginning of a new church year can be a great time to give a fresh start to your group.

Here are some questions to get your leadership thinking about how you can grow this year:

The Freedom of Surrender

I eagerly anticipated retirement’s slower days and freedom to travel. What I didn’t anticipate were the questions: Who am I now? How do I surrender my all in this season?            

God’s call to surrender, sacrifice, and serve with all that I am didn’t change because my life season changed; it became different.

Who Will Eat These Cookies?

Bill and I are retired empty nesters, and we’ve downsized several times; the latest to a neighborhood of young families who are constantly on the go.

“How are we going to connect beyond a wave as they drive by?” we prayed. The Christmas cookie swap at church was our answer.

ESL / Basic English

This page is for people whose first language is not English. Every Christian needs to take part in missions!

WMU tries to help Christians understand God’s mission. It also helps them take part in missions—with love and excitement, and in ways that are beyond what is usual or expected! It is for women, men, teenagers, children, and preschoolers. It is for the whole church! Learn more about WMU! Learn how it can serve you and your church.


Missions Plan Book is a wonderful tool to help you learn about missions, support missions, and take part in missions, all through the year!

A Brother’s Witness

A revivalist preacher’s message made it very clear that I needed a Savior, but my thirteen-year-old response was a fearful one that didn’t last. I married, had children, and continued to live life my way.

One sunny afternoon, while sitting on the porch with my brother, he said to me, “Sister, you know that your girls deserve to be in church.” His words pierced my heart, and I knew he was right.

Group Styles

Women on Mission groups are built around Bible studies, prayer, mission action, witnessing, and mission study. Establishing a Women on Mission group is not difficult or complicated. There does not have to be a long roster of “officers” or a large leadership team. Naturally, some structure will follow growth— so be prepared for that! Growth is a naturally desired outcome of beginning any new missions group.

Women on Mission functions primarily through small groups whose members seek to accomplish God’s missions purpose in the world. While Women on Mission groups relate to all of the WMU objectives, one or more of the objectives may be chosen as a special focus of a group. Common organizing interests include missions learning, missions praying, mission action, and Bible study. Group members then determine when, where, and how often their group will meet.

The meetings and activities of Women on Mission groups can take on many forms depending on the audience or target group. Groups may choose a group name, which helps identify the group, especially when there is more than one Women on Mission group in a church.

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