Women on Mission

La Union Femenil Misionera

¡​La Junta de Misiones Internacionales busca más misioneros hispanos!

Navidad en Agosto 2015: qué es • misioneros sugeridos •historia

Cómo usar el paquete de énfasis (WMU Emphasis Kit 2015–2016)

¡Bienvenido a la Unión Femenil Misionera!

La UFM es la expresión hispana de Woman's Missionary Union (WMU). Incluye organizaciones de niveles por edad, Familias en Misiones y actividades intergeneracionales. Hay muchas oportunidades para que toda la congregación pueda participar en la obra misionera para el reino de Dios.

La UFM también ofrece recursos en español para usar en la iglesia. (En wmustore.com ponga "Spanish" en la caja de "Search".)

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Frequently Asked Questions for Adult Missions

What is the difference between WMU and Women on Mission and Adults on Mission? Aren't they the same thing?

WMU is the overarching missions organization for all age levels, from preschool to adult. It has the word Woman in its title because it was started by women and in most churches is coordinated by women. Women on Mission is the organization within WMU for women. The relationship is similar to your Bible study or Sunday School program in your church. Sunday School is the term for all the classes, no matter what the age level is. Within Sunday School you have adult classes, children's classes, etc. Adults on Mission is a coed organization for women and men in mission.

What are the positions of leadership needed for Women on Mission and Adults on Mission?

Never Give Up When Someone You Love Is Lost

Never Give UP

As much as you love your family members and friends and desire for them to know Jesus, remember that God loves them more and His will is that all should be saved (2 Peter 3:9).

View your personal relationships as your missions field. Be intentional, but avoid appearing judgmental. Guard against being “holier than thou.” Always let your words and deeds be spoken and done in love. Sometimes this is difficult because of age differences and generational cultural changes. However, God does not change. He is the same yesterday, today, and forever—a fact people often forget or choose to ignore.

Trading Up: Hurt for Healing

Trading Up: Bible Stories That Move Us from Pain to Peace

Bartering was popular when I was a young mother. That was the way we often managed to have better clothes for our children, haircuts, music lessons, or even luxuries such as massages. The idea was to trade with your friends: your talents for their knowledge, your professional skills (i.e., hairdresser) for theirs (i.e., masseuse). Oftentimes we knew we had really “traded up.” We were thrilled with our bargaining powers.

The plan was our way of taking what we had and trading it for what we needed. Using this same principle, Janet Erwin and Murselle McMillan wrote Trading Up: Bible Stories That Move Us from Pain to Peace. This WMU resource is designed, through the use of Bible stories and study guides, to help victims of post-traumatic stress disorder trade up: fear traded for hope, anger for forgiveness, and guilt for truth. Giving pain up to God and receiving His gift of healing in return is trading up at its best.

Stealing the Spotlight

You worked incredibly hard on the project, pouring your very best into every detail. You dotted every i and crossed every last t to ensure a successful outcome. Your fingerprints and personal touch are splashed all over the project; anyone could clearly see that you did all the work! But in the grand finale when the house lights went down and the spotlight shone brightly, a colleague stepped in from the shadows to take credit for it all. One spotlight earned yet stolen.

When Jesus called us as His disciples to deny ourselves, He knew that sometimes the cost would be physical, like enduring a beating or going without food or shelter. He also knew that sometimes the cost would be to our egos. If we fail to look at these pride-busting situations with our spiritual eyes, then we won’t recognize these opportunities to deny ourselves for Jesus’ sake and our flesh will win.

Dealing with relationship problems? Ask God to teach you how to deny yourself in every situation and pick up a cross to follow in Jesus’ footsteps.

Not-So-Nice People

I’m not sure how it fell on the ears or landed in the hearts of the disciples when Jesus called them to deny themselves, pick up their cross, and follow Him (Mark 8:34), but for me, it painted images of beautiful sacrifice.

I’m talking about teaching Bible stories under a scrubby tree in sub-Saharan Africa, climbing rocky hillsides to take the gospel to an unreached people group tucked in high-elevation villages, eating raw fish to take one for the team (the missions team, of course), or studying long hours over complicated Bible passages. These are the self-denying, cross-bearing activities I was ready to embrace. But when a selfish, whiny, paranoid woman wandered into my life and God told me to deny myself and love her unconditionally, well . . . it knocked me for a loop.

Don’t get caught up in the larger-than-life, grandiose ideas of what sacrificial living has to look like for a believer. It can be all those things, but it can also mean sitting at the bedside of an aging parent or learning to love a difficult person who has never known Christ’s love. Look far away and then look close to home: how is God calling you to deny yourself?

The Load Unbundled

By Kimberly Hart

Are you struggling to carry a heavy load? Here are some tips for carrying a man-sized load:

  • Know what needs to be hauled.
  • Consider the distance and destination.
  • Lay aside additional weight.
  • Determine who or what can help.
  • Consult owner for special instructions.

So how do you carry a cross—see notes above. The instruction given by Jesus in Luke 9:23 to carry our cross can be hard to understand. The meaning can be lost in “churchy” language. It can also be clouded by the world’s idea that anything rough is a cross to bear.

Share His Light: Ministering with Others to Others

By: Gail Veale

Looking for a ministry and someone to serve with you? There are many opportunities in your community to share and spread the light and love of Christ.

Prayer and Passion

Pray for God to reveal your passions. Reflect on how you have served in the past and the blessings you gave and received. Ask God to open doors and then follow His leading.

Two by Two

As Jesus sent out His followers in groups of 2 (see Luke 10:1–2), you can pray for and seek out someone to minister with you. Two neighbors visited my mother-in-law recently and brought her flowers from their yard. They stayed only a few minutes, but the impact was long lasting!

Bright Light Sites

You can begin your search for a ministry to plug into at wmu.com/ministries. Are you passionate about serving struggling people in your community? Then volunteer with your local Christian Women’s Job Corps or Christian Men’s Job Corps site and help women and men gain job skills and life skills.

Leadership Training for Women on Mission

Develop is WMU’s online and on-demand leadership training! It is a tool to help WMU leaders equip their churches and missions groups to be radically involved in the mission of God.

Each course

  • offers quality training to WMU leaders;
  • serves as stand-alone training or part of a WMU leader certification program;
  • is cost effective, easy to access, and educationally sound.

Currently online for Women on Mission Leaders:

Leading Women on Mission
A course to introduce and provide step-by-step guidance in leading a Women on Mission group.

Uniquely Designed: Adults
A course to help you discover you how God has designed the unique physical, mental, social, and spiritual characteristics of adults throughout the stages of adulthood.

Prayer Quilt Ministry

Following are more best practices that the women of First Baptist Church in Cherryville, North Carolina, shared with us, in addition to those featured in the March 2011 Missions Mosaic article, "Covered in Prayer."

 

Structure

This ministry can easily be structured to meet at two different times of the day to accommodate anyone wanting to attend. First Baptist Church in Cherryville, North Carolina (where this project originated) chose to have their meetings on Tuesdays. In the morning session, mostly retired women attended and then in the evening, they generally drew in women who worked during the day. They shared that some women came to both sessions. 

 

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