Women on Mission

Mats for the Homeless

Help the homeless in your area

See a step-by-step video and print instructions for creating lightweight and easily mobile plastic bag mats for the homeless.

Printable PDF instructions (one page, with photos)

Printable PDF instructions in Spanish


Instructional Video on YouTube (five minutes)

Featured in the September 2012 Missions Mosaic.

Hemming Children in Prayer

Dust off that sewing machine and find your pins and scissors. Use your sewing skills to weave God into the lives of children around the world.

Mary Beth Turberville, a school nurse, returned to her home in Phenix City, Alabama, with a renewed heart for ministry after a Baptist Medical and Dental Mission International trip to Nicaragua. The Lord put a vision in her head and a deep passion in her heart to share Christ through a children’s clothing ministry.
 
Turberville explains, “Missions has always been a part of my life, but in the past if I had time, I was willing to serve. Now I serve the Lord first; then if there is time left, I might do what I want. Life is not about me, but about God and what I can do for others.” With this heart change, she began to use the sewing skills she had always possessed to minister to children in other countries.

 
Sewing Seeds

Here’s how:
1. Set a date and location for a sewing bonanza. Invite women of all ages—from girls to grandmas. Bring your non-believing friends to this non-threatening event.
 
2. Organize and collect your supplies.

Backpacks for Human Trafficking Victims

Download a printable pdf with instructions for making backpacks that will promote awareness for human trafficking victims.

Printable PDF instructions (Two Pages)

Project mentioned in the February 2013 Missions Mosaic

All Dolled Up . . . Dolls on Mission

Finished dolls

The Dolls on Mission (DOM) feature was such a hit with groups all around the country! Here is all you need to know to start and finish this unique mission project.


Build-A-Doll Workshops
Instructions
Helpful Tips
Patterns
MORE: Salvation Necklaces
MORE: Backstory of Dolls on Mission


Finished Product Photos:

Sisters Who Care

Since its inception in October 1999, Sisters Who Care has been an integral part of Women on Mission and its efforts to include and encourage all women to be radically involved in the mission of God. Sisters Who Care is fully committed to the focus and over-arching mission of Women on Mission and seeks to motivate African-American women to join with other SBC sisters in fulfilling the Great Commission.

Sisters Who Care small group

Bring the women of your church together for a time of missional focus for the world and for your community. More detailed information on beginning or enhancing a Sisters Who Care small group may be found on our community small groups page.

Web Extras for Adults

Your Women on Mission group or Adults on Mission group may be looking for some extra ways to provide variety in your group meetings, or you may be looking for ways to connect with men and women who may not come to small group meetings but who want to be involved in focusing on missions. These "Extras" are just the thing!

Feel free to email us if you have any questions.


A Year at a Glance

A full PDF file of the upcoming 2015-2016 New Hope books and WorldCrafts picks each month.


Book of the Month

What missions-minded adults are reading in January: Finding Your Way by Sandy Lovern

WorldCrafts Item of the Month - Ebony Candlesticks from Kenya

Sewing Ministry Projects

"A thimbleful of imagination combined with a few creative stitches can lead to truly amazing sewing ministry projects."

The patterns listed in this .pdf are (in the following order):

  1. Knitted Eyelash Scarf
  2. Crocheted Eyelash Scarf
  3. Pillowcases
  4. Mastectomy Pillows
  5. Knitted Prayer Shawl
  6. Crocheted Prayer Shawl
  7. Knitted Dishcloth
  8. Drawstring Bags

Printable PDF instructions (5 pages)

Projects listed in the April 2013 Missions Mosaic.

Next Generation Vision

As a parent, I’ve always strived to teach my children about missions and involve them in mission action whenever possible. My children are now 16 and 13 and grew up in Girls in Action and Royal Ambassadors. They know what it means to be on mission.

My vision for them is to continue being on mission every day of their lives. There are many opportunities with our church and their school to continue to develop this mind-set.

I plan to encourage them to be involved in missions by having them participate with me, helping them find ways they can do missions, and educating them about current events so they can brainstorm ways they can be on mission.

It’s up to us to cultivate a vision to encourage and teach the next generation to live a missions lifestyle that honors God.

Jennifer Booth writes from her home in Little Rock, Arkansas. Connect with her on her blog at JenniferBooth.com.

Missions Matters!

Sometimes it “pays” to look down. This is one way our family finds extra funds for the Lottie Moon Christmas Offering.

When our children were young, we began the tradition of depositing any money found throughout the year into our Mission Jar. This included money discovered in the pockets of clothing to be washed, in vehicle seats, between couch cushions, and especially lying on sidewalks—I once stumbled across $7 this way! In December, we would take our money to a coin changer and include the total in our missions offering.

While our Mission Jar was a family project, it is always interesting to discover the creative ways churches publicize the international missions emphasis. My friend Sue’s church makes Lottie Moon come alive for young children by displaying a life-size cutout of Ms. Lottie and allowing the youngsters to compare their own size to this diminutive missionary to China.

Impact

What do you truly value? Today’s culture applauds success, beauty, power, wealth, and status. Being considered “humble” is certainly not a label to be envied. Yet a large group of Christian writers can point to the encouragement and mentoring of a couple greatly characterized by their humility.

David and Joanne Sloan, both respected and successful writers, responded more than 20 years ago to God’s call to equip Christian writers for fruitful ministry. They founded the Southern Christian Writers Conference, which convenes annually in Tuscaloosa, Alabama.

As conference directors, their organizational work and personal contributions were never referenced nor were their own impressive credentials. Even serious health issues were hidden. Their goal was to teach writers to pursue their dreams of writing to honor God. Additionally, twice a year, the Sloans opened their home to provide small groups a day of more intense training.

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