Women on Mission

Best Challenges Better

Which door should I go through? The popular television show Let’s Make a Deal serves as a reminder that none of us know for sure what is behind the curtain or beyond the door. Often in living our lives for God, we find safety in just staying where we are. That may be in church, in a position of leadership, or simply showing up and doing what we’re asked. After all, there is nothing inherently wrong with where we are. It’s better than doing nothing.

But living in the realm of better can blind us to the best. So what can we do?

1) Open our eyes to the range of possibilities available.

2) Prayerfully and honestly assess the better option and the best choice.

3) Do not be afraid to step out of our comfort zones. The best will always carry a little more risk. It may demand more from us than we are currently giving.

4) Trust God to support us in carrying out the best when better seems good enough.

“Do not be afraid; do not be discouraged, for the Lord your God will be with you wherever you go” (Joshua 1:9 NIV).

Networking Works

“My nephew has threatened suicide several times since returning from Afghanistan,” she said. “He seems so close to doing it. We’re constantly worried about him.” A total stranger from another town was telling me this when we were both getting our nails done. “I just wish I knew how to get him some help.”

Thanks to a group of churches (pastors and members), along with other interested community organizations in her town, I could direct her to a local pastor who was passionate about helping soldiers coming home with PTSD and suicide ideation. All over Arkansas communities and churches are coming together to be ready when the need arises.

In our state the local VA assists in forming these groups, but realistically, they can form without VA assistance. Representatives from churches, directors of non-profits, members of law enforcement, local business owners, and other interested parties meet monthly and discuss issues affecting returning veterans. They gather resources and put together guides to those resources.

Crafts and Skills Fair: Use the “Indoor Months” for Ministry

Every winter comes the challenge to not just hibernate but continue seeking to engage in missions and ministry. Colder weather seems to limit outreach ideas to our lost and unchurched neighbors. But what if the temperatures that drive people to stay indoors could work with us, not against us?

Many people who are unfamiliar with a church environment need to see the church as a friendly place, a place where they already know someone before they attend services. So invite them and their families to a crafts and skills fair.

For a couple of hours, open your church and teach basic life skills and crafting classes in different parts of the building. Ask church members with various gifts and talents to teach and pull in others from outside the church. Encourage adults and students to rotate in and out of the classes they desire to take.

Consider offering these classes:

Missionary Spotlight Update: Enio Agüero

Chaplain Enio Agüero believes chaplains are ministers called by God. He asked that others support chaplains by praying for them, making ways to help them serve. He said, “Prayer support, and I don’t know how to describe it: Do whatever you have to even if it’s stepping aside when you see a need and don’t know how to react. Call somebody. Don’t stay still. Don’t do nothing. Somebody else might be able to help that individual. And that individual may be going through something in their mind after losing everything or receiving a notification, or whatever it is, and you may be there. And if you don’t know what to say, find someone who will help them. Don’t leave them hanging.”

Enio Agüero is featured in the January 2017 Missions Mosaic Missionary Spotlight.

Dianne Swaim has answered God’s call to serve as a hospital chaplain in Little Rock, Arkansas.

Obedience: Always the Best Choice

In 2015, Jack and Melody Williams* left Benin, their home of 24 years, to reestablish an International Mission Board presence in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). Benin was not an easy place to live, but Melody Williams fell in love with the country and its people. The Williamses learned French, Benin’s official language, and Fon, a language spoken by about 1.2 million Beninese. Learning Fon helped Melody Williams lead many to Christ.

The grief of leaving behind friends and ministry partners in Benin still lingers, but the Williamses are not only seeing a tremendous work of God in DRC but also being content with difficulties for Christ’s sake.

Though DRC is considered a “reached” nation because 80% of the population claims Christianity, some of its evangelical churches have been corrupted by the influence of animism, spiritism, witchcraft, and sorcery.

“During a war, those who had known Christ did not pass on their faith and teachings on repentance, surrender, and the cost of discipleship,” Melody Williams said.

Doing More Than Training Students to Be Christians

“Drexel is Different” proclaim billboards throughout Philadelphia, and Brian Musser, Baptist campus minister, couldn’t agree more.

Located in the heart of Philadelphia, Drexel University is home to a student population of more than 25,000 students.

Since he arrived on campus 11 years ago, Musser has not only established a Baptist presence but also helped several Christian organizations find a place at Drexel, which is important because “no one organization is going to reach the entire campus.”

As Mission Service Corps missionaries for the North American Mission Board, Musser and his wife, Jennifer, raise their own support. A diverse group of more than 100 churches in Philadelphia Baptist Association helps, but partnerships with other evangelical churches throughout Philadelphia are important.

Praying and Giving

Missionaries tell us that our prayers are the most important thing we can do for them. Opening my eyes to the world around me causes me to spend more time in prayer for missionaries and Christians around the world. WMU keeps us focused on them, where they minister, and the difficulties they encounter as they serve God.

As I communicate with missionaries through social media, I find myself drawn into their world by the stories and pictures of their people groups and their ministry. I am especially drawn to my brothers and sisters around the world who are being persecuted because they bear the name of Christ.

My family has designated the Lottie Moon Christmas Offering® as our “Christmas Gift for Jesus” and no gift we give others compares to this gift. You might want to consider putting your Lottie Moon Christmas Offering in an envelope this year, tie a red ribbon around it, and mark it “To: Jesus. From:_____.”

On Mission in Jerusalem

In my church we are constantly seeking ways to be involved in missions. Our Director of Missions and other church leaders work together to provide activities for each month in our schools, nursing homes, hospice, shoeboxes for Operation Christmas Child, Thanksgiving and Christmas outreach to needy families, and associational missions. We also reach out to the military, veterans, police officers, and firefighters.

Our pastor selects an IMB missionary and a NAMB missionary for our focus each month. We learn about the missionaries’ work and where they are serving. Some women connect with them online and maintain lasting relationships. He also brings missionaries to speak at our church and encourages us to be missional in our community as well as around the world.

IMB and NAMB appoint and commission missionaries to serve in the United States and around the world, but God has appointed every one of us to serve in our church family and community. Are you on mission in your Jerusalem?

Seeing the World Around Us

When my husband first became a pastor, we attended a language ministries conference. I was overwhelmed with the love I witnessed
among the people in that meeting. Jesus said, “Go into all the world and preach the gospel to all creation” (Mark 16:15 NIV). God had sent the world to our doorstep, and to every nation He had given special people to love them and minister to them here in the United States.

Today we are automatically positioned to see the world around us—at grocery stores, medical offices, restaurants, the post office, theaters, and schools. Do you see them—those new to the country, struggling with the language, trying to fit into a foreign culture? They say loneliness is one of their biggest problems. They are waiting and watching for a friendly face that cares about them as a person.

The Blinders Are Off

I grew up in rural North Carolina in a small town that was similar to the fictional Mayberry. Farming and fishing were the main industries, and families working together brought a closeness and a feeling of security that you cannot find today. Everyone knew all their neighbors on a first name basis—doctors, lawyers, merchants, farmers, fishermen—it didn’t make a difference. It was a stable, comfortable life, and my husband and I were only vaguely aware of the evil all around us until we had children.

During the 1970s we became deeply concerned about the changes we saw taking place in the world our children would inherit! The cultural changes in families, the increase in divorce, the use of drugs and alcohol, and the “anything goes” attitude of the younger generation. However, our children were still young and the evils we saw and heard about on radio and TV seemed far away from us—no need to worry—or so we thought.

A TV pastor said, “Don’t worry. The pendulum swings; this will pass.” But it didn’t pass. The blinders were off! We began to pray for revival in our country and the protection of our children.

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