missional lifestyle

Five Ways to Keep "Love Your Neighbor" Going All Year Long

teach children to help neighbors by working in the yard

Reports are coming in from all across the country. Children and their leaders have taken part in an amazing effort to “Love Your Neighbor.” For our tenth annual Children’s Ministry Day, we encouraged you to get out there and seek out inventive ways to serve those closest to you. But now that CMD 2017 is over, where do you go from here?

Here are 5 ways you can keep “Love Your Neighbor” going all year long:

Leading Students with WMU in Mind

As you lead your student group, I’ll bet the last thing on your mind is the list of WMU objectives. Before you flip past it in your next WMU Catalog or Year Book, take some time to think through each one. You might be surprised how integral these points are to our shared faith.

Pray for Missions

When was the last time you led your group to pray for a missionary? What about praying for someone you knew needed to feel the love of Christ? Praying for missions is no small thing. When you bring these prayers and petitions before God, it solidifies them in your own heart and often motivates you to action.

Engage in Mission Action and Witnessing

As followers of Christ, our faith must move us to action. It’s never enough to simply “feel” for someone who needs Christ. Share that love with them, my friend! And help your students see that they too are a valuable part of the mission of God.

Eternity-Based Leadership

 

It is no secret that we often focus much of our lives on results-based leadership, which doesn’t seem to be biblical. Sometimes this pull for results comes from our deep desire to be found worthy in our jobs. We desire to be considered a bargain—pulling more than our weight and contributing significantly. Yet, as we read Scripture,we find something different.

In the first chapter of 2 Peter, we see a man who has walked with Jesus coming to the end of his life. What is it that Peter most wants to leave behind? And how does it compare with what we want? For Peter, he wants the believers (the brethren in KJV and my brothers and sisters in NIV) to make every effort to confirm their [your] calling and election so that they will not stumble. He wants them to have a rich welcome into the eternal kingdom of Jesus Christ. Why does this concern Peter so much, and why should we be concerned about eternity rather than the results we want to see?

How can leaders help girls develop a missional lifestyle?

I have a confession: I’m not perfect. There, I said it. Even though I was a pastor’s child, a GA, and a pretty good girl, I still didn’t understand what it meant to live on mission with God. I know my leaders meant well, but this is what I walked away with as a teen:

  • I need to read my Bible.
  • My friends are lost, and if I don’t make sure they are saved, it’s my fault if they go you know where.
  • If I have problems, I need to pray.

Not all bad things, but it didn’t compel me to fulfill the Great Commission either. Don’t get me wrong—I loved hearing the stories, I learned about Lottie Moon, and for heaven’s sake, I was the 1995 Associational GA Princess (What, what!). But there was still something missing.

Helping someone develop a missional lifestyle doesn’t start in the mind; it begins in the heart. Below you will find four tips to help you develop a strategy to engage girls in cultivating a missional lifestyle.

Number One: Set Goals.

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