Missionary Stories

Keep on Truckin’

Life on the road with an 18-wheeler in the United States can be hard. But there are relaxing truck stops along the way and comfortable berths and even satellite TVs in many trucks. Life on the road in West Africa is very different.

Truckers face long delays at border crossings with no facilities. They may sleep on mats by their trucks, cooking over open fires. They sit in the shade of their rigs for hours or days . . . waiting . . . talking . . . waiting. “They are sitting there with nothing to do except hear the gospel,” said Katee Sheppard*, an International Mission Board missionary in Burkina Faso.

So she began sharing oral stories from God’s Word, targeting truck drivers, and from there, training more and more nationals to do the same thing. As trucking routes connect all of Africa, the vision was for those West African truckers who became believers to share the gospel all along their routes. Ordinary truckers have become carriers of the divine message.

Connect with Others

Everyone has a story—good times or bad, sorrow or joy, boring or exciting. And just as we are all unique, our stories are unique.

In the past few years, Danielle Gonzalez’s story has been one of “wearing many hats” as she serves on staff of New City Church in New York City. (New City is a part of the North American Mission Board’s Send North America strategy to plant churches in major urban areas.) Presently Gonzalez is director of ministry administration, handling everything from logistics for Sunday mornings to helping in the accounting department to helping implement new ministry projects.

Since her story includes God’s story, she looks for places where the gospel is not present and discovers ways to take her story to the people there. Gonzalez has taken her story to local hangout places and workplaces.

Missionary Spotlight Update: David and Chris Cole

This summer was an exciting time at David and Chris Cole’s church, Oak Tree Church in Lee’s Summit, Missouri. The church hosted a youth camp, a holiday fireworks display, and a craft day for women. The craft day was the first one put on by the church and connected women for Christ over a special, one-sitting project.

As kids go back to school during the month of August, family schedules become busier. Pray for the Coles, their 5 sons, and their church, as they, too, must manage busier schedules and work to continually point people to Jesus. Of the more than 20,000 people within a 3-mile radius of the church, 91% does not attend church. Pray for Oak Tree to be able to reach many families for the Lord.

Missionary Spotlight Update: George and Megan Lane*

“There are only a few believers in . . . 1 of the main villages we work in and the strongest believer is a 14-year-old kid named David*. He has only been saved a few years, but he is growing rapidly in his faith. He shares the gospel with some of his friends even though they don’t accept it and mock him some for it. He does not have electricity at his home, so when it gets dark there isn’t really anything he can do. But he has the New Testament on an audio device so he listens to that from nightfall until he goes to sleep. He knows the Bible very well! He can quote from memory many parts of the Bible. Since he doesn’t have the Old Testament on audio (and he can’t read very well yet), George has been teaching him the Book of Exodus. After teaching about Moses and the burning bush and how the voice from the bush said, ‘I AM,’ George flipped over to John 8, when Jesus says that He is the ‘I AM.’ As George was reading in [the Zarma language], David was pretty much quoting the whole chapter from memory!”

*Names changed.

Hospitality Brings Jesus’ Love to Neighbors

Each day, the population of Phoenix and Tucson, Arizona, increases significantly. Phoenix grows by about 300 daily, or about 100,000 annually.

With only 1 Southern Baptist church for every 18,500 people, it is an ever-present challenge to get the message of Jesus Christ’s love to newcomers and the 5.49 million people already living in the metro area, said Monty Patton, a Send City missionary and founder and co-pastor of Mountain Ridge Church in Glendale, located northwest of Phoenix.

Patton works with sending churches and their church planters to establish ministries in Phoenix and Tucson. He; his wife, Nancy; their 2 daughters; and their son-in-law are all devoted to area church-planting efforts.

They have found that building relationships is essential in proclaiming Jesus Christ to the burgeoning masses—1 person at a time.

Simple Gestures Open Doors to Gospel

Mandy Wells prepares “memelas” (small tortillas brushed with bacon grease) with some national friends in Oaxaca, Mexico.

Sharing a meal or inviting someone into your home for coffee or water shows hospitality in this city of about 300,000. Though simple gestures, they create opportunities to establish friendships with indigenous people and share about Jesus Christ.

Wells and husband Jim are missionaries in an area of Oaxaca (pronounced wah-hah-cah). The couple and their 2 young children have been there 16 months.

“One thing that we really try to do is build friendships,” Mandy Wells said. “Whether people come to Christ or not after having heard the gospel, we will still be their friends and continue investing in their lives. . . . Simply spending time really getting to know people opens the doors for us to share the gospel with those around us.”

Finding Waldo

When Peter Assad was scouring the pages of the Where’s Waldo? books as a child, he had no idea that a couple of decades later he and his wife, Grace, would be planting a church in Waldo.

So where’s Waldo? At one time a town on the southeast side of Kansas City, Missouri, Waldo is now a lively family neighborhood and business district in the heart of the city, with a population of about 13,000. Assad said Waldo is “a very diverse area, boasting a small-town feel while remaining very much urban—young, old, rich, poor, white, black, and everything in between.”

In January 2016, he and a team of committed leaders launched The Church in Waldo, which is presently sharing a building with Antioch Baptist Church. “We seek to reach the diversity of Waldo through a diversity of ministries all united around this single theme: to know Jesus and make Him known,” Assad said.

Getting “Out of the Box” to Reach the Deaf

Deaf pastor and church planter John Wyble and his wife, Denise, serve the Deaf community through 2 Deaf congregations in Virginia. They use American Sign Language to communicate God’s message of redemption.

What are some of the challenges you face in reaching the Deaf and how do you deal with those?

John: We have to overcome the walls built up through worldly lifestyles. We have found through years of ministry that building relationships is crucial. By living a righteous and compassionate example, we are ready to share the gospel when the right time comes. One example is when deaf ladies at our church host a women’s retreat on the beach. They will pay the way for unsaved friends. They were thrilled when the unsaved woman Denise sponsored became a believer.

What are some of the ways your churches serve the community?

Just Another Mom

Tomoko joined the small group meeting at Miriam Christy’s home mainly as a chance to meet other moms—particularly expatriates who were living in Peru. Tomoko and her husband had moved to Peru from Japan for his job.

Each week, a group of moms gathered at Miriam’s home to hear her teach chronological Bible storying. In the course of the studies, a mom at the local school died of cancer. Miriam decided for her next study she would discuss what the Bible says about suffering and sorrow.

Tomoko later told Miriam that she was raised in a nonreligious home and had had difficulty believing in a god because of suffering in the world.

“Of course there is no God, because how could there be a god if things like this happen,” she would think.

After Miriam’s Bible study, though, Tomoko’s perspective began to change. When Tomoko’s husband lost his job, she said her first thought was, “There is no God!”

“But then she remembered what I had taught her and she said, ‘God is good, so maybe God has a better plan and this is just a part of it,’” Miriam said.

Missionary Spotlight Update: Holly Procita

The scent of buttery popcorn filled the community center as neighbors gathered for a movie night. Southwinds Church in Calgary, Alberta, partnered with the local community association to host the event. Holly Procita, community outreach coordinator for the church, and other church members served popcorn and juice to the 200 people who attended.

“It was the largest event of its type at the community center!” said Procita, who also serves with the North American Mission Board. “Pray that we can continue to provide opportunities for our neighbors to encounter our church family in fun and exciting ways.”

She recently helped train church planters in how to organize and host sports camps. She has hosted similar camps, and now she is helping church planters in Calgary and Edmonton use camps to reach their communities.

“I have learned a lot in the past 5 years and am really enjoying sharing what I’ve learned with these men and women who are reaching other parts of our city with the gospel,” she said.

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