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Together for His Kingdom

Years ago, my husband and I worked with singles in our church. One of our social outings was a river canoe trip. One year my friend Melinda and I were paired in a canoe. It was a great day. The sun was shining. We proceeded without major incident until the very end of the trip. There had been a tremendous amount of rain that spring. The river ran high and fast. It was not a problem until the last bend right before we were to take the canoes out of the river. The force of the water made it difficult to navigate the canoe. Our canoe hit a bridge embankment and flipped. I got trapped between the canoe and a tree under the water line. The water was rushing so fast, I could not move.

I was a strong swimmer and felt very comfortable in the water, but I started to panic being trapped. I finally got my head above water enough to scream. I saw out of the corner of my eye a man sitting on the bank looking upstream. I yelled, “Help!” as loud as I could.

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“As Southern Baptists learn how God is at work around the world, they GIVE of their resources and offer more informed prayers for those who have committed their lives to following the Great Commission into all the world so the gospel will be proclaimed among all people.” —Wanda Lee, National WMU executive director/treasurer, emerita

WMU believes in the importance of stewardship and giving to missions. WMU actively promotes giving to the two missions offerings which supply approximately half of the annual budgets for the International Mission Board and the North American Mission Board. 

WMU urged to 'not grow weary in doing good'

Linda Cooper

ST. LOUIS (BP) -- International Mission Board church planter Sabastian Vazquez couldn't escape the inevitable emotions as he stood before a group of women whose legacy had led to four generations of pastors in his family.

Speaking during day two of the 2016 Woman's Missionary Union (WMU) Missions Celebration and Annual Meeting, Sabastian unsuccessfully fought off tears as he told the story of a new Southern Baptist missionary who a century ago handed a Spanish-language evangelistic tract to an illiterate baker named Angel Vazquez, his great-grandfather. Angel knew the missionary had given him something very special because of the way in which he gave it to him. He became a Christian and asked the missionary to teach him how to be a pastor, too. His son, grandson and great-grandson, Sabastian, would follow in his footsteps.

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