Making Friends

Holding a baby that could easily be a Gerber model, Jill and I struck up a conversation next to our apartment pool. Obviously, the blue-eyed doll she held was the conversation starter, but we talked for a while after about her life and family.

As we talked, Jill told me, “You know, I have never really met any of my neighbors here before,” referring to the apartment community she has lived in for the last 3 years.

My heart soared when she said this, because this is exactly what my husband and I have prayed for in the apartment God has placed us in. That community will flourish and we will have opportunities to share Jesus.

With her confession, I responded, “Well now you know at least one person. We should go for walks sometime.”

There is something about being pursued in friendship as an adult. It’s as if once we all moved past school where we were in a place with a lot of people going the same direction as us, we lost track of how to bridge the divide and make friends with strangers.

As Jill and I spoke, her wall began to come down and she exuded a joy in getting to have an adult female conversation besides caring for her children in her home.

I have prayed for these relationships, ones with my neighbors who are outside of my Christian bubble.

My prayer is to be able to share with Jill about the all-consuming love of Jesus, and I hope she will know His love in a radical way.

So many people are out there waiting to be loved. They are waiting to be pursued and have ears ready to hear the gospel. These may be people who would never step foot into our church in order to hear it, so we must step outside of our comfort zone and do “radical” things.

Say hi.

Ask about their world.

Listen.

Maybe invite them over to your apartment for coffee.

It takes one simple choice to be bold. That could change one person’s entire world.

 

 

Abi Khavari traveled the world, writing for a non-profit agency in the Middle East. She now lives in Colorado, got married recently, and is earning her masters degree in counseling.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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