Preschool

Teaching Preschoolers about Hunger

Teaching Preschoolers about Hunger

During October, Southern Baptists will turn our attention toward Global Hunger Relief. Unfortunately, hunger is an issue that touches every community throughout the world. While we would never share graphic details about hunger with our preschoolers, we can certainly raise their awareness that people in their own communities and around the world do not have enough to eat, and that we want to reach out to help those who suffer from hunger.

One resource that will help you develop age-appropriate learning about hunger is Teaching Preschoolers about Hunger (E118102, $9.99). This downloadable, interactive, 4-session study provides teachers, preschoolers, and their families new insights into the issue of global hunger.

The following suggestions will give you some ideas for adding lessons on hunger relief into your church’s schedule:

Keeping Babies Safe

baby on back

For Baby Safety Month in September, we offer these tips to make sure babies are safe while at church.

We Work Together

Steve and Jen Hagen

Steve Hagen mobilizes tribal churches in the Philippines to send out missionaries to unreached tribal people groups. He helps organize the churches and teaches them how to send out and support missionaries. He also works with missionaries who have been sent out to ensure they are working strategically and effectively.

To free up Mr. Hagen’s time for the writing and traveling that he does for trainings and meetings, Mrs. Hagen takes care of most of the administrative and organizational responsibilities in their ministry. She regularly keeps their prayer supporters updated and informed about their work. She communicates with and coordinates the work of volunteer teams. And, if a problem arises, she helps Mr. Hagen develop solutions. Additionally, she disciples and counsels women.

Mr. and Mrs. Hagen’s teamwork in their ministry is a beautiful illustration of the way that God gives each of us different gifts and equips us to work with others to fulfill our calling. As I read of the Hagens’ coordinated and shared responsibilities, I thought of the Bible thought that we often express to our preschoolers: We work together (see 1 Cor. 3:9).

Project HELP: PTSD—Helping Preschoolers with Family Trauma

Hurting family

Little 3-year-old David took my hand as we looked out the window, watching and listening as an ambulance drove by the day-care center. He said in a quiet voice, just so I alone could hear, “I rode in that ambulance.” I had to choke back my own tears because I knew he remembered a terrible, violent incident that happened to him a few months before. That summer, he would wear a shirt when our child-care class played outside in the sprinkler because he did not want the other preschoolers to see the scars on his belly from stab wounds that almost killed him.

Project HELP: PTSD—How to Use with Preschoolers

Project HELP logo

As WMU focuses on Project HELP: Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), all ages in the church are encouraged to be involved in this critical issue. You may be wondering, How can I focus on this critical issue with preschoolers?

Following are recommendations about using Project HELP: PTSD with preschoolers.

Hints for Preschool Teachers

How to Grab Preschooler’s Attention—Introductory Activities

Introductory Activity

Getting preschoolers’ attention is no easy task! Keeping it is even harder. Preschoolers don’t always understand that you have to pause and listen when someone’s talking, or that it’s considered bad manners to talk and play while someone is speaking. They haven’t yet learned how to delay self-gratification! So, when you’re beginning your introduction to Group Time, it’s important to do something that will grab and keep your little ones’ attention! Here are some examples:

A New Year in Mission Friends

to-do list

Here is a To Do list for the beginning of the new church year in Mission Friends.

Caring for Families

Caring for families

As you teach preschoolers, you are in a unique position of showing care to families who have a child with special needs. You may have preschoolers with special needs in your class, and that gives you the opportunity to come to know the parents and the needs within the family. What are some ways that you can minister to a family with a special needs child?

By All Means

By All Means

“I have become all things to all people so that by all possible means I might save some. I do this for the sake of the gospel, that I may share in its blessings” (1 Cor. 9:22–23 NIV1).

“Camp is for the camper.” I heard that statement many times from our GA/Acteens camp director, Ruth Bagwell, as I served as a camp counselor while a college student. When she said this, the camp counselors knew she meant that camp was not about us, but was about those girls who were coming to experience camp. As a camp counselor, that might mean getting up early when the girls in your cabin voted on a breakfast cookout, being in a silly skit to make the girls laugh, or sharing your testimony in front of a group of campers. It meant that we sometimes had to get out of our comfort zone to do things that would most benefit the campers.

Making

making a sand castle

Do you remember making something as a child? I remember making doll clothes and being so proud of what I made. The doll clothes became more complicated as I got older and learned how to sew, and it was fun to make outfits for my doll to go on a picnic or whatever I was playing with her at the moment. I also remember making other things such as loom pot holders and dying Easter eggs. I loved making things!

Our preschoolers today also enjoy making things. There is a whole “making” movement that is making its way even within preschool education. We have seen it for a while now in adults with do-it-yourself projects being so popular. Now we are seeing the making movement arising for preschoolers and children. Much of making with preschoolers involves science, technology, arts, and math. Preschoolers are encouraged to experiment and explore in building structures, taking apart equipment, or using various art media. Preschoolers might combine technology with other areas, such as using printed photos as a background for their painting.

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