Women on Mission

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This page is for people whose first language is not English. Every Christian needs to take part in missions!

WMU tries to help Christians understand God’s mission. It also helps them take part in missions—with love and excitement, and in ways that are beyond what is usual or expected! It is for women, men, teenagers, children, and preschoolers. It is for the whole church! Learn more about WMU! Learn how it can serve you and your church.


Missions Plan Book is a wonderful tool to help you learn about missions, support missions, and take part in missions, all through the year!

Trash or Treasure: A Unique Garage Sale Ministry

garage sale sign

Do you enjoy scrambling through someone else’s no-longer-wanted items to find just the treasure you have been seeking? You may not even know you need an item until you discover it among the collection of treasures. Garage sale junkies, both men and women, are utterly thrilled with their finds.

Rethink garage sales! What if your church organized a garage sale where the items were free as a way to develop relationships in your community that might lead to sharing Christ?

Share Who You Are by What You Share

sharing over coffee

When people ask you to share a little about yourself, are you inclined to begin by describing the different hats you wear: mentor, mother, teacher, or the like? Some titles indicate relationships we have formed, while others describe a status. For Ross and Shirley Mackin, sharing who they are means living out their Christian faith in their relationships. The Mackins, International Mission Board church planters in Thailand, are active in sharing who they are by what they share with the people around them.

On one occasion, the couple went to see a woman named Rose* at her chicken and rice stand on the main road where Ross had once distributed tracts. But Rose was not there. She had pointed out to Ross the direction where she lived, so Ross and Shirley decided to drive that way, hoping they might spot Rose outside her house. As the couple were driving, they saw Rose in her garden. God had led them to her, and they were able to follow up with some good conversations.

Missionary Spotlight Update: Cynthia Martin

Cynthia teaching English

Cynthia Martin and her husband, Tom, feel as if every refugee who comes their way in Las Vegas is sent there on purpose by God, and over the past year, that has included a number of Afghani families.

“The men speak English because they were translators for our US military in Afghanistan, and because of that, their families were threatened and then had to flee Afghanistan for safety,” Cynthia said.

They may speak English well, but their wives don’t, and so they approached Cynthia to ask if she would be willing to teach their wives.

“I was already teaching 2 classes per day, but they could not attend those classes,” she said. “After praying for wisdom, I knew that God had brought these women to Safely Home [Refugee Ministry] and I needed to engage with them.”

So she started a new class just for them so they could bring their children with them.

“That meant that at the end of an already full day, I had 2 more hours of teaching approximately 8 Afghani mothers with about 15 preschoolers running around,” she said.

Tell Me about Your Country: 4 Ways to Help Refugees Feel Loved and Welcomed

Asian boy at laptop

Kelsey Smith has met a lot of refugees, but she remembers 1 boy in particular. “He was 14, fresh off the plane from his country of asylum, spoke almost no English, and no one else in the program spoke his language,” said Kelsey, who works with a nonprofit organization that helps refugees begin to build a life in the United States. “He appeared tired, dispirited, and completely uninterested in participating in our activities.” She couldn’t figure out how to connect with him.

Then 1 day, Kelsey walked by the computer lab and saw that he was using Google Earth to look at his home country. “I sat down beside him and used gestures and simple words to ask him questions about his country, and that was the happiest I’d ever seen him,” she said. “His face lit up as he used what few words he had to tell me about his home.”

Reaching out to refugees is important—and making them feel at home is vital, Kelsey said. She offered several ways to interact with refugees to make them feel loved and welcomed in their new country:

Missionary Spotlight Update: Eric and Julie Maroney

Maroneys

Relationships are everything in Croatia. It takes years of living through the good and bad together to create a certain level of trust. Eric and Julie Maroney are ready to live through some of the good.

Soon after filling out the WMU questionnaire for the story about their family in the April issue of Missions Mosaic, Julie was diagnosed with cancer. It was not a convenient time for the diagnosis—the Maroneys were leaving their eldest child, Nathan, in the United States at college after 19 years of living in Croatia with the International Mission Board (IMB). The diagnosis brought their active lifestyle to a standstill.

After a year of cancer treatments in the States, Julie received the “all-clear” to return home to her neighbors and friends. Eric, Julie, and daughter Kayleigh didn’t just pick up where they left off; they entered Croatia running to keep up.

Taking Hope to the Hurting: Network with Social Services to Meet Needs

homeless woman

Picture a lonely single mom standing in line at the social services office or a young woman getting out of prison with no family or friends to support her. Imagine a middle-aged man addicted to painkillers, feeling misunderstood by his peers as he struggles toward recovery.

What do all these people have in common? They are all individuals with spiritual, emotional, and physical needs.

So often when we search for missions projects, we overlook the desperate human needs all around us. For many of these isolated individuals, their only connection to “help” is agencies outside the church. Finding these people can help us bridge the gap and build relationships for the kingdom.

Ask your local social services office for specific ways your missions group members can help area individuals. What are people’s most desperate unmet needs? Would the office allow you to post a flyer or church brochure on its bulletin board?

To Refugees, with Love

refugee children registering for school

It looked like a normal apartment complex in the western part of Las Vegas, Nevada. Vickie McDaniel and her husband, Eric, went to check it out, but they weren’t interested in the actual facilities . . . just the occupants—refugees.

It was just supposed to be a time of prayerwalking and asking God’s love to shine. But God had bigger plans! He asked the North American Mission Board church planters to move to this complex and let the refugees experience His love firsthand.

“We prayed daily, spent time in His Word, and allowed the Holy Spirit to show us where God is at work in our community,” Vickie McDaniel explained. “God spoke to Eric and I. He wanted us to move so as to be more accessible. . . . This allowed us to meet, help, love, and build relationships.”

It’s Worth Your Time: Reach out to Refugees

reaching out to refugees

Have you ever moved to a new place where you didn’t know anyone? It seems as if it takes forever to find your way around and get used to new roads, grocery stores, and schools. Without family or friends nearby, it’s easy to withdraw.

Then it happens. A new colleague at work or person at the church you’re visiting offers some advice or recommends his or her most trusted mechanic. Life gets easier and you settle in. While we can probably all identify with this experience at one time or another, can you imagine doing it without knowing English? The majority of the refugees in our midst encounters this reality daily.

We focus in our churches on the need for refugees to learn English, and that is important. But in the meantime, how do they find housing, enroll their children in school, and understand how to get insurance or a driver’s license? The details of life can be overwhelming for a person who has never had to register his or her child for school or go to the health department for immunizations.

Make it Personal: Build Relationships with Refugees

Headline news reports daily showcase the worldwide refugee crisis. Governments pass laws to deal with influxes of homeless internationals. Communities struggle to find solutions to growing multicultural populations. Neighbors voice conflicting opinions. What should believers do in the face of such turmoil?

Sure, we care about the refugee issue. But how can we change caring about the issue to caring for the refugee? Instead of being overwhelmed with current events, let’s allow God to use us to reach the nations, one person at a time, right in our own backyards.

Ways to Create Space for Relationships

Physical Space

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