Lottie Moon Christmas Offering

In Honor of Lottie

She sailed across the sea
To a land so far away.
She left behind her expected life,
When she heard what God had to say.

God placed a call on the heart
Of a woman named Lottie Moon.
She gave her answer faithfully,
And would arrive in China soon.

She made her new home
Among the people there.
They didn't trust her at first,
But she always showed them care.

She learned the language of the people,
And dressed like those around her.
She baked her cookies happily,
And drew people in closer.

At last, they trusted Lottie—
She was finally able to share
About the love of Jesus Christ
And His sacrifice laid bare.

Lottie dearly loved these people
With all her heart and hand.
But she knew she couldn't do alone
Everything God had planned.

So she sought out help for God's work
From her Christian brothers and sisters.
She wrote letter after letter after letter after letter
To all the misses and misters.

Prepare Your Heart

This past Sunday marked the beginning of the Advent season, a time of preparation for the birth of Christ. I spent the weekend decorating my house, both inside and outside. At church, we adorned the sanctuary with wreaths, garlands, holly and ivy, poinsettias and Chrismons during the traditional Hanging of the Green service. It's even beginning to look a lot like Christmas here at the national WMU building!

Yet, just as we decorate our homes, churches and offices for this special season of the year, we should also prepare our hearts for the coming of the Christ child into the world. A meaningful way to do this is by participating in the Week of Prayer for International Missions from December 3–10.

Throughout the week, pray for missionaries around the world as they share the good news of Jesus with all the nations. Visit this page on the International Mission Board's website for more details about the missionaries, as well as specific prayer requests for each day:

Giving to Missions

School Roof Tile

The green tile is a great reminder to me of the impact preschoolers and children can have when they give to missions. This single tile that sits on a shelf in the WMU lobby has a chevron design and a flower. A plaque beside the tile notes that it is from the Tung Shan Church which was built in Canton, China, in 1908 by the Sunbeam Bands of the USA. Sunbeams was the forerunner of Mission Friends®, and the children at that time were encouraged to give their money towards building a church in China. The children were told about the need for people to hear of Jesus, and encouraged to give as their part in sharing the gospel with people around the world. I wonder how many people heard about Christ because of this Chinese church that the Sunbeams built?

Family Traditions

Country music fans are probably familiar with the song titled “Family Traditions.” It plays quite frequently on the radio.

This weekend, that song went through my mind as I remembered my family's tradition of putting up Christmas decorations during Thanksgiving weekend. Back in my childhood days, my father, brother, and I would head out to the woods to look (for what seemed like hours) for the perfect Christmas tree. Finally, once we had found the perfect tree, my dad would take the axe and cut it down. Then, we’d head home and get the tree ready to be decorated. For the next few hours, we’d pull out old decorations, lights, and even that long, stringy, silver tinsel that wound up everywhere but on the tree.

Show your support to missions

Be an active part of missions work all over the world when you give to the Lottie Mon Christmas offering and Annie Armstrong Easter Offering. 



Lottie Moon Christmas Offering

Purpose: In 1918, Woman’s Missionary Union (WMU) named the annual Christmas offering for international missions after the woman, Lottie Moon, who had urged them to start it.

Why this strange indifferences to missions? Why these scant contributions? Why does money fail to be forthcoming when approved men and women are asking to be sent to proclaim the ‘unsearchable riches of Christ’ to the heathen? — Lottie Moon, October 3, 1887, Pingtu

SBC Offerings

Support missions

“As Southern Baptists learn how God is at work around the world, they GIVE of their resources and offer more informed prayers for those who have committed their lives to following the Great Commission into all the world so the gospel will be proclaimed among all people.” —Wanda Lee, National WMU executive director/treasurer, emerita

WMU believes in the importance of stewardship and giving to missions. WMU actively promotes giving to the two missions offerings which supply approximately half of the annual budgets for the International Mission Board and the North American Mission Board. 

Give to Missions

The foundation of giving to missions is biblical tithing and sacrificial giving through the church. Giving to missions work is not only a blessing but also an honor and a privilege. WMU actively promotes giving to the 2 missions offerings, which supply about half of the annual budgets for the International Mission Board and the North American Mission Board, and giving through the Cooperative Program, the foundational means of supporting Southern Baptist work in each state, nationally, and around the world.

A New Idea for a Yearly Event: LMCO

For the last few years, the GAs at our church have hosted a “Latte Moon” café to raise awareness and support for the Lottie Moon Christmas Offering. While this whimsical play on Miss Moon’s name brings a few chuckles, this event has helped our congregation realize the impact our GAs can make on international missions simply by providing donuts and coffee in between Sunday School and worship services.

Here’s how we do it:

A Mission’s Drive

It’s that time again! Time to set aside our Christmas offering for international missions. I confess I never really paid too much attention to the Lottie Moon Christmas Offering® that my church promoted every year. Sometimes I would write a check, but I didn’t always.

That changed when my husband’s brother received an appointment as an international missionary. That’s when I discovered the importance of the Lottie Moon Christmas Offering.

My brother-in-law’s family spent 10 years in Malaysia. The Lottie Moon Christmas Offering provided financial support and helped them fulfill their mission.

Missionary families depend on the Lottie Moon Christmas Offering for their ministry and livelihood. For those of us who can’t go, giving is one way we can help fulfill God’s commission to make disciples of all nations (Matthew 28:19). 


Sandra Knox Miller writes from her home in Sylacauga, Alabama. 

 

 


 

When Lottie Wrote to Annie

If you come for a tour at the National WMU building in Birmingham, Alabama, you are bound to see the letter. That’s right, the letter written by Lottie Moon in 1889 to Annie Armstrong. Perhaps the 2 most influential women in Baptist life at the turn of the 20th century, Annie and Lottie both left an incredible legacy.

So, what does a letter from the most celebrated missionary to the most recognized supporter of missionaries look like? It’s all about the task at hand.

There is work to be done. While Lottie expresses gratitude for what has already been given, she sees a need for greater commitment. She urges Annie to send as many workers as possible to join her in China. So much had already been accomplished, but with each passing year, Lottie knew she alone could not see the job through to the end.

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