Missions Mosaic

Missionary Spotlight Update: Jason and Cheryl Dietz

Dietz family at a park

Jason and Cheryl Dietz and their children have just begun a yearlong stateside assignment. Every 5 years, missionaries across Europe must leave their country of service for a long period of time because of agreements between those countries and the United States. The Dietz family must be out for a full year.

Stateside assignment is often a bittersweet time for missionary families. They are eager to reconnect with family, friends, and favorite foods in America, but their thoughts are never far from their home across the pond and the important work that goes on there in their absence. The Dietzes are no different.

“We have 2 new [missionary] families—and 1 likely on the way—while we are gone,” Jason shared. “Pray for our national partners while we are gone . . . and for our team spread out over our 5 cities.”

Perhaps most heavy on Jason’s and Cheryl’s hearts is the fact that 2 of their children will be heading to university while on this stateside assignment and won’t be returning to Germany with the family next year. “That is a huge adjustment,” Jason admitted. The Dietz family appreciates your prayers during this time of adjustment.

Missionary Spotlight Update: Bart and Jane Anne Gibbs

drummers

During this very hot season in West Africa when daily temperatures can soar to more than 100°F, Bart and Jane Anne Gibbs need your prayers. “The heat and humidity sap one’s strength, resilience, and patience,” Jane Anne said. Disruptions to electricity and water service don’t help. “Cuts in service interfere with everyday life to the degree that it is a challenge sometimes to maintain a positive outlook,” Bart said.

Traveling around the region to mentor and supervise other missionaries is rewarding work, but during this season, trips are long, hot, and fatiguing.

Another source of frustration is Internet access. Burkina Faso’s Internet service has been described as “the world’s slowest and most expensive,” Bart said. “In this world of ‘connectedness,’ everyone is expected to easily access the Internet. We also must report about our work and finances regularly using Internet that is sporadic, slow, and frustrating. Waiting on downloads or uploads can seem like such a waste of time when we would much rather be with people, but part of our job requires that we communicate electronically. It can be a struggle to find a balance.”

Missionary Spotlight Update: Cynthia Martin

Cynthia teaching English

Cynthia Martin and her husband, Tom, feel as if every refugee who comes their way in Las Vegas is sent there on purpose by God, and over the past year, that has included a number of Afghani families.

“The men speak English because they were translators for our US military in Afghanistan, and because of that, their families were threatened and then had to flee Afghanistan for safety,” Cynthia said.

They may speak English well, but their wives don’t, and so they approached Cynthia to ask if she would be willing to teach their wives.

“I was already teaching 2 classes per day, but they could not attend those classes,” she said. “After praying for wisdom, I knew that God had brought these women to Safely Home [Refugee Ministry] and I needed to engage with them.”

So she started a new class just for them so they could bring their children with them.

“That meant that at the end of an already full day, I had 2 more hours of teaching approximately 8 Afghani mothers with about 15 preschoolers running around,” she said.

Missionary Spotlight Update: Eric and Julie Maroney

Maroneys

Relationships are everything in Croatia. It takes years of living through the good and bad together to create a certain level of trust. Eric and Julie Maroney are ready to live through some of the good.

Soon after filling out the WMU questionnaire for the story about their family in the April issue of Missions Mosaic, Julie was diagnosed with cancer. It was not a convenient time for the diagnosis—the Maroneys were leaving their eldest child, Nathan, in the United States at college after 19 years of living in Croatia with the International Mission Board (IMB). The diagnosis brought their active lifestyle to a standstill.

After a year of cancer treatments in the States, Julie received the “all-clear” to return home to her neighbors and friends. Eric, Julie, and daughter Kayleigh didn’t just pick up where they left off; they entered Croatia running to keep up.

Missionary Spotlight Update: Week of Prayer for North American Missions missionaries

It’s in our DNA as Southern Baptists to pull together as a community of believers and spread the gospel.

In the 1880s, Annie Armstrong pioneered the Maryland Mission Rooms, a missions literature library that detailed and circulated information regarding vital needs on the missions field. Armstrong called for women’s groups throughout the United States to pool their “egg money” and prayers for missions. Women knew that by combining their efforts, they could make an impact.

It might be 2018, but the goal remains the same. The Annie Armstrong Easter Offering enables North American missionaries to plant new churches, care for those in the community, and reach the lost all across the United States, Canada, and their territories. It is one of the most unique cooperative offerings in that 100% of the gifts go to support and equip missionaries.

Missionary Spotlight Update: Bronson and Anna Parker*

“I made one trip to Gate-Town to do a training,” Bronson Parker shared. “All went well, but we received notice that I am not allowed to travel on the river to any of the communities.” Because Marcus*—president of the association in Gate-Town—remains in power, little has changed in the modern-day Wild West atmosphere of the Amazon Basin.

Losing his only source of income, Pedro* was forced to quit his teaching job. “But God is good and is providing for Pedro,” Parker said. “He and his family came to live with us for 3 months. We were able to disciple them further in the faith.”

Since then, Pedro has started 3 weekly ministries: a children’s ministry in Gate-Town; a discipleship group with 2 families in Gate-Town, who are forming into a church; and a ministry with the lost in his home village, Village 7, where he has been sharing Bible stories. “Many are listening, and we believe some will come into the kingdom soon,” Parker reported.

Missionary Spotlight Update: Ryan and Seane’ Rice

Ryan and Seane’ Rice continue to minister and see God doing great things through Connect Church of Algiers in New Orleans. Their church is ethnically diverse and they reach out to help many on the fringes of society.

Oak Park Baptist Church, a sister church that had served the community for more than 60 years, fell on some difficult times with declining membership and problems reaching out to the community. The leaders of Connect Church and Oak Park began to talk about the possibility of merging the 2 churches. As the leaders of both congregations talked, they felt the Holy Spirit leading them to come together to better serve their community.

Missionary Spotlight Update: Jared and Tara Jones

Jared and Tara Jones knew that God could do a lot with something little. But they never imagined just how many doors He would open through their young son, whose adoption people had told them was almost impossible in Japan. In the East Asian country, 40,000 children live in orphanages, but parents rarely give up their rights so that a child can be adopted.

But the Joneses knew God had placed a baby on their hearts, so they prayed, and not too long after, they both got the impression that they were praying for a particular expectant mother. Soon after, God opened the doors and gave them favor with Japanese social workers, Tara Jones said.

“The birth mother had asked to meet us, and it was the most emotional day,” she said.

The Joneses thanked the young mother for her courage, for her choice to give him life. They prayed God’s presence would be so strong in the room that the mother would remember that day and God would fill her with peace all over again.

“We wept, and so did the social worker,” Tara Jones said. And the Joneses walked out of the hospital and onto the train with Ezra in their arms.

We All Need Redemption sidebar

Pastor David Tarkington shared this additional advice and resources about gender-identity issues as a supplement to the article on page 24 of December 2017 Missions Mosaic.

As parents of children with gender-identity issues, remember

  1. It’s not your fault. I emphasize this reality to Christian parents who have done the very best they knew how to raise their children in the ways of the Lord.
  2. To trust God. He loves your child more than you ever have or can.
  3. To love your child. This may be the most challenging aspect of the journey. Remember that loving your child does not mean affirming sin.
  4. Prayer is vital.
  5. God is good. God is great. He is not taken by surprise, though you were. Trust Him.

Remember God knows grief and will stay in the valley with you until you make it through.

Resources

Out of a Far Country by Christopher Yuan and Angela Yuan

Missionary Spotlight Update: Brian and Heidi Frye

Because there are so few activities targeting children of collegiate church planters, they are immersed in church-planting events alongside their parents. “Children spend far more time learning the gospel and seeing it work in the lives of college students who come to their homes, teach them on Sunday mornings, and who babysit as their parents lead, teach, disciple, and mentor,” explained Brian Frye, collegiate evangelism strategist in Ohio. The end result is a life-changing experience for them. “It is very normal for children of collegiate church planters to say, ‘I want to plant collegiate churches when I grow up.’”

Ministry/Witnessing Tools

Below are examples of ways Frye and his wife, Heidi, successfully plant collegiate churches in Ohio:

Pages

Back to Top