Children

How to Lead a Child to Christ

Leading a child to Christ is one of the most exciting things you will ever do. It can also be intimidating. Remember that, while God has called you to share this message, it’s the work of the Holy Spirit that leads a child to give his or her life to Christ.

Don’t give into your fears. Pray first. Then, invite the Holy Spirit to work with you as you share.

1. Be Conversational

When counseling one-on-one with a child, be conversational. Ask open-ended questions, then listen closely to the child’s reply. Questions to ask a child might include:
• Who is Jesus?
• What is sin?
• What is a Christian?
• Why do you want to become a Christian?
• How do you feel? (Sometimes the feelings we have are God’s way of speaking to us.)
• What has led you to start thinking about becoming a Christian?
• How long have you wanted to be a Christian?
 

2. Use the Bible

During the conversation, show the child verses in the Bible. Slowly explain the following verse to the child.

Going for the Gold

Hello from Birmingham, Alabama! The high today — on February 20 — is 77 degrees! Can you believe it? (Probably, if you know anything about Alabama weather.) I love the cold weather, so I'm a little put out about it. It's supposed to get into the low 80s later this week. Meteorologists are saying we're going to break record highs for this time of year. If you like warm weather, I'm happy for you! If you like cold weather, we can commiserate together.

But enough about my weather pattern opinions. Let's focus instead on that word "record" I mentioned above. We're in the midst of the final week of the 2018 Winter Olympics. While the focus is on winning that gold medal, we often hear about athletes breaking world records while they're competing. Talk about exciting! What if you could use that excitement with the kids in your missions group?

Healthy competition can be a useful tool to encourage kids' participation in missions projects and during your weekly meetings. Here are some ideas to help you take a cue from the Olympics and get your kids more involved than ever.

Welcome to Children's Missions Day

Join thousands of kids across the country in hands-on ministry in your community for Children's Missions Day! WMU invites all children in grades 1–6 to participate on Saturday, February 17, 2018.

From feeding hungry people to visiting shut-ins, boys and girls follow God's command to "put your love into action" (1 John 3:18). Church groups create projects that meet needs in their own communities. WMU created Children's Missions Day to move children out of their churches and into their communities to do missions. The first Children's Missions Day was in 2008. Since then, thousands of people have taken part in this special day.

*You may have noticed we’ve recently changed the name of this event from Children’s Ministry Day to Children’s Missions Day. Don’t worry — this is not a typo! We’ve put plenty of thought and prayer into this change. Follow this link to read a little more about the difference between ministry and missions.

CMD 2018: Go Serve

Children's Missions Day (CMD) 2018 is coming soon! In fact, this annual February event will celebrate its 11th year this Saturday, February 17. It's not too late to join other children's missions groups nationwide in a great day of service to share God's love with people right in your own community. So, lace up your sneakers and get ready to hit the road and go serve!

Appropriately, the theme for this year's event is Go Serve. As you prepare your group for this special day, help children identify people in your area who are hurting — whether it's physically, spiritually or emotionally. Remember that a successful CMD project gives children the opportunity to tell someone what they know to be true about God while also meeting a physical need or offering words of encouragement. Ask children, What would you do for these people to share the love of Jesus with them?

Get 'em Before They're Gone!

I guess I'm like most men. I really don't like shopping. Oh, I'll go to the hardware store. That's okay. Or, I'll go to the sporting goods store if I really need something. But, most of the time when I have to shop, I'd rather do it online in the comfort of my own home or office. And when I shop online, I love the fact that I don't have to wait in long lines to accomplish the task at hand — you know, "Need it, find it, buy it and wait for it to be delivered to me."

Once a year, national WMU offers an incredible clearance sale that even I like — great items, great variety and really great prices! All I have to remember for this particular sale is that when the stock has been depleted, it is sold out. There are no back orders.

Right now is the time for the annual clearance sale! There are some great items available — at great prices — for children's missions leaders like you! But if you don't want to miss out on these great deals, you'd better hurry. Once an item has sold out, it is gone for good.

The following items are included in this year's WMU Clearance Sale:

Spring Break Is Right Around the Corner!

It's winter now, but spring break is on its way! Got plans yet? I would think many of the families in your church already have plans for spring break and maybe even have trips planned. That makes this month the perfect time to go ahead and put missions projects into families' hands for them to do while on vacation.

Consider sharing these ideas with the families of your church. (Tip: You can post these individual suggestions in social media or share a link to this blog in your church or children's ministry newsletter.)

Ideas for family spring break missions:

Happy New Year Book!

It’s that time again—time to start planning for the new year. The new year in WMU, that is.

When you think about planning for WMU, the WMU Year Book most likely springs to mind. For years, it has been the annual planning resource for church WMU leaders. It outlines the WMU emphasis, provides monthly plans for each WMU age-level organization, and highlights ways to be involved in WMU ministries. Still, you may have found it, well, incomplete.

In order to do more detailed planning each quarter, you have needed a subscription to Missions Leader. The quarterly kit provides implementation ideas for the emphases on the Southern Baptist Convention’s calendar, along with leadership tools and color posters.

Complicated, isn’t it?

Not anymore. WMU has put everything you need to plan for a successful year of missions education and involvement in one resource. And all those other helpful things like posters? Throughout the year, supplemental materials will be posted as exclusive digital content on wmu.com.

Doing a Lot with a Little

I recently had the opportunity to re-read the story of Jesus feeding the 5,000.

To recap, over 5,000 people came to hear Jesus and even be healed by Him. Gathered out in the middle of nowhere, people started getting hungry as the day wore on. Jesus perceived the need at hand and asked His disciples where they could find food for the people there. His disciples were not very optimistic. Even if they could find something for everyone, it would cost as much money as a single man could earn after 200 days of work just to give 1 person a tiny piece of bread to eat. What they did find was a small boy who offered to share what he had: 5 loaves of bread and 2 fish.

Spoiler alert: with those 5 loaves of bread and 2 small fish, Jesus was able to abundantly meet the needs of the people. Not only was He able to meet their stomachs, but there were also 12 baskets of food left over! It was a miracle! Something only God could do.

Lead with Confidence

As a small child, I was afraid to go to the counter at a fast food restaurant to ask for a drink refill. I hated it so much. I couldn't tell you why—the people behind the counter didn't have a reason to refuse me a free refill. And I highly doubt the scenarios of humiliation I pictured in my head would have ever happened in real life. Nevertheless, I was too shy. My parents would usually make me go anyway; otherwise, I wouldn't get a refill. I’m thankful to them now for trying to get me to be less shy, although I'm certain I didn't appreciate it at the time!

When I was in school, I had so many opportunities to speak up and answer questions posed by my teachers. I probably only spoke up about 15 percent of the time. I felt a desire to raise my hand when I thought I knew the answer, but I didn't want to risk being incorrect and humiliating myself. As it happens, I usually had the correct answer and would be disappointed that I didn't speak up. But I couldn't risk it, right?

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