myMISSION Blog

How the Bible Tells Us to Live

The world tells me to think of myself. The Bible tells me to deny myself.

The world tells me to get angry when someone wrongs me. The Bible tells me to turn the other cheek.

The world tells me it’s OK to do this or that because everyone else does it, too. The Bible tells me to avoid the things that would bring me down and tarnish my witness to the world.

So many conflicting views are thrown our way every day, but it is our job to know what the Bible says so we can weed out the ways of the world and focus on what our walk with Jesus is meant to be. The truth of the gospel is that Jesus Christ came to earth to live a perfect life, die on the Cross, and take our place to save us from what we deserve for our imperfect lives. And while we all know that we aren’t perfect, we know that through Christ, we have forgiveness, redemption, and the freedom to live the way Jesus wants us to live.

The world we live in encourages us to be self-centered and look out for ourselves above all others. But everything about the gospel is the exact opposite of this mind-set. Let’s think on how deeply the gospel differs from what the world tells us.

10 Ways to Use Your College Break to Reach Others for Christ

Your car is packed, the fridge is empty, and you’re longing to turn in that last paper so you can finally head home for Christmas. But don’t leave your passion for missions behind with your books. As you prepare to make the trek home for some much-needed rest and home-cooked meals, consider these opportunities that await you in between semesters:

The Gospel at Christmas

Understanding the gospel at Christmas is a beautiful thing. A Savior is born . . . to 
be in His Father’s house; to preach, teach, heal, free, and feed the masses; to make disciples; to die for our sins and be resurrected to give us life; to ascend to heaven; to ask the Father to send His Spirit; to prepare a place for us; and to come again.

The gospel, in its purest form, is the “good news” that Christ died for our sins, came back to life, and offers eternal life to all who receive Him as Lord and Savior. The Light of the world all humanity had waited for could now be seen with human eyes and touched with human hands.

When we truly understand the gospel, we can respond with faith, turn to Jesus and away from all that would distract us from this life of love. We are changed forever. Nothing is ever the same. We see ourselves differently. We are different—from the inside out, everything is changed. We are alive! And we have an overflow of love that never runs dry. We can love everyone around us in Jesus’ name. We can invite them into the love of the gospel, to experience the reality of heaven, even now, at Christmas.

Purposefully Praying for Lost People

We sat on the concrete floor with our friends’ family surrounding us, waiting intently for what we would say.

Our friends were newly married, and we’d been invited back to the family home to stay overnight.

We had the opportunity to share the gospel and encourage the family, and it was an answered prayer happening right before my eyes.

Days before, I had been praying for this trip and had asked others to pray, too. I knew I’d be around people who have yet to come to faith in Jesus, and I wanted to be able to share the gospel with them.

That night, 3 people who had yet to believe in Jesus heard the story of a God Who created them and loves them. And while 3 seems small, to me, they represent billions of lost people around the world who haven’t yet heard and responded to the gospel.

Why do we pray for these lost people? Why did I take the time to pray to have an opportunity to share the gospel while celebrating the marriage of 2 friends?

3 Things Taking Our Toddler Overseas Taught Me about Missions

Teaching the gospel has no age barrier. We as Christ followers are commanded to make disciples of all nations—to live life with people in a way that encourages another Christ follower. When we first thought about taking our almost 2-year-old daughter overseas, we got all the questions: “Why are you taking her? She won’t remember it.” “Aren’t you afraid of something happening to her while you’re there?”

Then, we took her overseas. And it vastly expanded my idea of what reaching the nations is about. I learned 3 things about missions from taking my toddler overseas:

Pray for the Harvest

I’ve got a question for you. When you read the following verse, what do you feel?

“Then he said to his disciples, ‘The harvest is plentiful but the workers are few. Ask the Lord of the harvest, therefore, to send out workers into his harvest field’” (Matt. 9:37–38).

Do you feel urgency? Do you feel responsibility? Do you feel the need to pray, pray, and pray some more?

If your answer to these questions is yes, that’s great! If your answer is no, we have a little work to do. I think I fall somewhere in between.

There’s been a theme in my life lately of God telling me to pray more. I don’t spend enough time in prayer, and when I do, it’s too often self-centered, even if that’s not my intention. What I really need to double-down on is praying for the lost. Sure, it’s easy to pray for things I’m worried about; it’s a little less but still important to me to pray for other people’s worries and fears. But how often do I think to pray for the lost? Specifically, how often do I pray for someone I personally know who is lost?

Step 1: Prayer

As much as I hate to admit it, many times my prayers closely resemble the Christmas lists I used to mail to Santa as a child—a list of very selfish wants and needs. While my requests to God have matured just as I have, they still very often revolve around me: “Lord, help me focus so I can ace this test,” or “give me the patience to deal with my co-workers.”

When I do extend my circle of prayer, it is usually to include my friends and family who I know have a relationship with Jesus Christ. But what about those who don’t? Why is it so important to pray for those who don’t yet know of God’s love, and how do we do it?

God is working in people’s lives long before they hear the gospel. That work continues with our prayers. It is the catalyst that ignites the desire to know God. When spreading the gospel, we are engaging in spiritual warfare. Prayer is one of the greatest weapons we have when fighting the enemy (Eph. 6:16–18).

Praying God’s Heart

Prayer is such a privilege. How amazing that we as humans are gifted with a connection to God, the ability to communicate with Him. What a mystery that the Creator of the universe somehow hears us. He listens to our concerns, our hurts, our dreams. He hears what is on our hearts. And He responds.

What about Him? What is on His heart?

Reaching the Unreached with Prayer

In the United States, the beginning of fall signals a season of bonfires, football, and cooler weather. In South Asia, fall is the beginning of festival season. Hindus across the region celebrate some of their major festivals, including the Ganesh festival and Diwali.

It has been quite the culture shock to see idols of Ganesh, the elephant-headed god, being displayed everywhere in my city and celebrated by many as the god of new beginnings.

According to the Joshua Project, 3,322 unreached people groups are in South Asia. These are people who haven’t heard the gospel yet—people who, as you read this blog, will be born, will live, and will die without knowing Jesus or the grace He offers them.

The amount of lost people can be overwhelming. Knowing where to begin to reach so many can seem like a lost cause. Not doing anything is not the answer though when the opportunity for people to hear and respond to the gospel and avoid eternal separation from God is at stake.

Fears and Families on Mission

“Why are you taking her? She won’t remember any of it. What if she doesn’t sleep on the plane? Aren’t you afraid of her getting sick?”

These are questions and statements we have heard numerous times since announcing we are taking our toddler overseas with us this month for a short-term missions trip. Our church has a partnership, through the International Mission Board, with a global city where my husband is leading our group. He went on a vision trip in April, and we agreed that when we went back, we would go as a family.

Little did we know that I would end up being 6 months pregnant when we go. But this isn’t the first time I have been pregnant in Asia. However, it is the first time I have been a mom with a toddler in Asia and pregnant at the same time.

Fear comes to us in hidden places. Am I looking forward to 27-plus hours of plane rides (just on the way over there)? Not really. Do I want my 22-month-old to get a virus I can barely pronounce because we brought her to Asia? Of course not.

Pages

Back to Top